About the National Archives

Fiscal Year 2001

Annual Performance Report

Submitted to the Congress
March 27, 2002


Table of Contents

Preface from the Archivist

Introduction

Strategic Goal 1: Essential Evidence

Strategic Goal 2: Access

Strategic Goal 3: Space and Preservation

Strategic Goal 4: Infrastructure

Appendix A: Outputs

Appendix B: Program evaluations


PREFACE FROM THE ARCHIVIST

In June 2001, author David McCullough spoke to an overflow crowd in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building. He was there to talk about one of our Founding Fathers - John Adams - as part of a series of events leading up to the 225th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. In vividly bringing to life Adams the patriot, the President, and the man, McCullough also gave tribute to the Charters of Freedom - the Declaration, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

McCullough said he was honored to be "in the presence of the three great documents at the heart of all that we are and all that we hope to remain forever. . . .  I feel deeply indebted to this magnificent institution where the life of our country is recorded in trust forever."

As McCullough so eloquently stated, the National Archives and Records Administration is a public trust on which our democracy depends. We allow people to see for themselves the workings of our unique government. We make transparent the story of the American people - our collective successes and triumphs as well as our blemishes and failures. All of the records we hold - from naturalization papers and military service records to land warrants and census rolls - are the records of our people, as essential to the functioning of our democracy as the Bill of Rights.

Without these records, we would not know or be able to understand our past. We would not be able to hold government officials accountable for their actions. We would not be able to claim our rights and entitlements. Without these records, we would no longer live in a democracy, for a society whose records are closed cannot be open, and a people who cannot document their rights cannot exercise them.

In this report you will find evidence of how we at the National Archives continue to ensure that we all have ready access to the records of our Government. For example, in 2001 we helped our country transition from one Administration to another. We began conservation treatment on the Charters of Freedom to ensure they will be available for many more generations of Americans to see. The National Archives Building is undergoing a major renovation, after which we will be able to showcase how the records of our people shape the history of our nation. We made important strides in our quest to find new ways to preserve electronic records far into the future, while at the same time providing our visitors the research tools and assistance they need to locate records today.

The work we do makes it possible to document the actions of our Government, the rights of our citizens, and the history of our nation. Please keep this in mind as you examine this report, as it is our commitment to these ideals that shapes both our daily work and our goals for the future. It is what motivates us. And it is what gives you a clear, personal stake in our success.

JOHN W. CARLIN
Archivist of the United States


Introduction


What is the National Archives?

The National Archives and Records Administration is a public trust on which our democracy depends. We enable people to inspect for themselves the record of what Government has done. We enable officials and agencies to review their actions and help citizens hold them accountable. We ensure continuing access to essential evidence that documents:

  • the rights of American citizens,
  • the actions of Federal officials,
  • the national experience.

To ensure ready access to essential evidence, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) establishes policies and procedures for managing U.S. Government records. We assist and train Federal agencies in documenting their activities, administering records management programs, scheduling records, and retiring non-current records to regional records services facilities for cost-effective storage. We appraise, accession, arrange, describe, preserve, and make available to the public the historically valuable records of the three branches of Government. We manage a nationwide system of Presidential libraries, records centers, and regional archives. We administer the Information Security Oversight Office and make grants to non-Federal institutions to support historical documentation through the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. We publish the Federal Register, Statutes at Large, Government regulations, and Presidential and other public documents.

We serve a broad spectrum of American society. Genealogists and family historians; veterans and their authorized representatives; academics, scholars, historians, business and occupational researchers; publication and broadcast journalists; Congress, the Courts, the White House, and other public officials; Federal Government agencies and the individuals they serve; state and local government personnel; professional organizations and their members; students and teachers; and the general public - all seek answers from the records we preserve.

To be effective, we must determine what evidence is essential for documentation, ensure that Government creates such evidence, and make it easy for users to access that evidence regardless of where it is, or where they are, for as long as needed. We also must find technologies, techniques, and partners worldwide that can help improve service and hold down costs, and we must help staff members continuously expand their capability to make the changes necessary to realize the vision.

Our Mission:

NARA ENSURES, FOR THE CITIZEN AND THE PUBLIC SERVANT, FOR THE PRESIDENT AND THE CONGRESS AND THE COURTS, READY ACCESS TO ESSENTIAL EVIDENCE.

Our Strategic Goals:

  • One: Essential evidence will be created, identified, appropriately scheduled, and managed for as long as needed.
  • Two: Essential evidence will be easy to access regardless of where it is or where users are for as long as needed.
  • Three: All records will be preserved in an appropriate environment for use as long as needed.
  • Four: NARA's capabilities for making the changes necessary to realize our vision will continuously expand.

These goals and the strategies to achieve them are detailed in Ready Access to Essential Evidence: The Strategic Plan of the National Archives and Records Administration, 1997-2007, updated and reissued September 2000. This annual performance report is based on the goals, strategies, and long-range performance targets in our Strategic Plan, and the specific objectives in our FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan. The following pages detail our performance on all our FY 2001 objectives. Checked boxes precede those we fully achieved. Those we did not fully achieve have open boxes with an explanation below. We also included all relevant performance results and trend information. Supplemental performance data for some objectives is included in Appendix A. We received no aid from nonfederal parties in preparing this report.

Budget Resources. Following is a summary of the resources, by budget authority, we received to meet our FY 2001 objectives.

Operating Expenses   $202,862,000
Repairs/Restorations   $101,536,000
Grants   $6,436,000
Total Budget Authority   $310,834,000
 
Redemption of Debt   $6,084,000
Total Appropriation   $316,918,000
 
Total FTE   2,714

Performance Measurement. We continue using four mechanisms to measure actual performance: (1) periodic management reviews, (2) formal audits of operations, (3) implementation and refinement of the agency's performance measurement system, and (4) systematic sampling of measurement system effectiveness. (Appendix B provides summaries of reviews, evaluations, and audits conducted in FY 2001.) In FY 1999 we deployed an agency-wide Performance Measurement and Reporting System (PMRS). This system allowed us to define and consistently measure data critical to the analysis of FY 1999 performance objectives. During the past two years we have continued to integrate and expand the system so that our strategic performance is measured using more of a balanced scorecard approach for tracking cycle times, quality, productivity, cost, and customer satisfaction for our products and services.

We reviewed customer feedback concerning our performance during FY 2001 and took action to respond to customer service needs. We developed this agency-wide report from detailed performance reports for FY 2001 at the office level and below. Taken together, the program evaluations, audits, measurement system, customer feedback, and office level plans and reports enabled us to identify program areas that needed attention, analysis, and possible re-engineering.

The work we have done on the performance measurement system has produced changes in some performance objectives to make them measurable or to clarify what is being measured. We continue to evaluate, improve, and make necessary adjustments to our performance measurement system in the course of our routine work. This report updates some of our FY 2000 statistics that were corrected as a result of these improvements. These on-going refinements indicate that this annual report, our annual plans, and our Strategic Plan are living documents and are an integral part of our operations.

We must succeed in reaching our goals because the National Archives and Records Administration is not an ordinary Federal agency. The records we preserve document the rights of American citizens, the actions of Federal officials, and the national experience. We serve not just today's citizens, but all who are yet to come. We must not only preserve documents already in our care, but also prepare to manage tomorrow's records in new and challenging forms. This report reflects our 2001 progress in making that a reality.


STRATEGIC GOAL 1: ESSENTIAL EVIDENCE

ESSENTIAL EVIDENCE WILL BE CREATED, IDENTIFIED, APPROPRIATELY SCHEDULED, AND MANAGED FOR AS LONG AS NEEDED.

Long Range Performance Targets 1.1. By 2007, 100 percent of targeted assistance partnership agreements deliver the results promised.
 
  1.2. By 2007, 60 percent of approved new records schedule items cover records created within the last 2 years.
 
  1.3. By 2007, the median time to process records schedule items is 120 calendar days or less.

FY 2001 Resources Available to Meet This Goal: $18,109,000; 156 FTE

1.1 TARGETED ASSISTANCE

FY 2001 Objective complete Deliver the results promised on 75 percent of targeted assistance partnership agreements.
 
Results  NARA delivered the results promised on 100 percent of targeted assistance partnership agreements.
 
"I feel much more confident that I am doing the right thing when I retire my agency's records."  NARA increased the number of partnership agreements established with Federal agencies from 173 to 227.
Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Number of targeted assistance agreements completed. -- -- 58
Number of successful targeted assistance agreements completed. -- -- 58
Percent of targeted assistance partnership agreements delivering the results promised. -- -- 100
Number of Federal agency staff receiving NARA training in records management and electronic records management. 2,997 3,506 2,506

Trend Analysis

We increased our partnership agreements with Federal agencies by 31 percent over last year, in part because we added 10 more senior records analysts to our team. However, the records management training we provide to Federal agency staff declined by 29 percent over last year. Many of our FY 2000 targeted assistance projects included extensive tailored records management training. This was not true of as many projects in FY 2001, where work included more management briefings and site assessments. Another reason for the drop in numbers receiving records management training was that we used some of our senior records analysts to support an important initiative examining the creation, maintenance, use, and disposition of records in Federal agencies (Target 1.3).

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

As we make targeted assistance the basis of the way we do records management, we expect to see significant improvements in the way Federal agencies manage their records.

1.2 SCHEDULE NEW RECORDS

FY 2001 Objectives complete Ensure 20 percent of approved new records schedule items cover records created within the last 2 years.
 
  complete Install and test a records management application at NARA.
 
Results  We ensured that 20 percent of approved new records schedule items cover records created within the last 2 years.
 
   We installed records management application hardware and software, and completed the systems test of the records management application.
Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Number of schedule items submitted by agencies. 4,199 8,090 3,224
Number of schedule items completed. 3,262 5,664 4,728
Number of new schedule items completed. 935 1,961 2,544
Number of new schedule items completed within 2 years of the records creation. 220 544 520
Percent of new schedule items completed within 2 years of the records creation. 23.52 27.74 20.44

Trend Analysis

Significantly fewer schedule items were submitted by agencies this year than last year. However, last year was unusually high because several agencies turned in comprehensive schedules. The number of new schedule items we completed rose by 30 percent over FY 2000 and 172 percent over FY 1999. We dropped off only slightly (4 percent) in our progress in completing new schedule items within 2 years of the records creation. This overall positive trend from FY 1999 to FY 2001 is the result of process improvements we made last year that yielded increased productivity.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We expect to be able to achieve our target of completing 25 percent of new records schedule items within 2 years of the records creation.

1.3 CLOSE OUT SCHEDULE ITEMS

FY 2001 Objectives complete Process records schedule items within a median time of 260 calendar days or less.
 
  not closed out Complete study of the creation, maintenance, use, and disposition of records in Federal agencies.
 
  not closed out Complete analysis of Federal agency business processes and the records they generate.
 
Results  We improved the overall cycle time for closing out records schedule items to a median time of 237 calendar days.
 
"With these tools and options, NARA will...ultimately improve the overall quality of records management in the Federal Government."  We completed a draft report for study of the creation, maintenance, use, and disposition of records in Federal agencies.
 
   We analyzed Federal agency business processes and the records they generate for 11 agencies.
 
   We closed out 14 percent of records schedule items within 120 calendar days of submission to NARA.

Explanation

We collected information on the views and perceptions of records management personnel, Chief Information Officers, General Counsels, Inspectors General, and staff involved in specific work processes in 42 Federal agencies concerning records creation, maintenance, and use through focus groups, interviews, and a web-based survey. Because of the extensive coordination required for this project and some additional analyses we deemed necessary to conduct, we did not fully complete our objective in FY 2001, and extended the work into first quarter FY 2002.

We originally intended to analyze Federal agency business processes and the records they generate at 12 to 15 Federal agencies. However, only 11 agencies agreed to participate. At the end of the study we determined that a few important agency cultures and work processes were not adequately covered. We will complete three additional analyses in FY 2002.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Number of schedule items completed. 3,262 5,664 4,728
Number of records schedule items completed within 120 calendar days of submission to NARA. 469 1,229 659
Percent of records schedule items completed within 120 calendar days of submission to NARA. 14.37 21.69 13.93
Median time for records schedule items completed (in calendar days). 336.5 283 237

Trend Analysis

We significantly lowered the cycle time for processing records schedules from 283 calendar days to 237 calendar days, a 16 percent reduction from last year. Overall, we have been able to reduce the cycle time by 30 percent since we began tracking this data in FY 1999. In FY 2001 the number of records schedule items that we completed within 120 calendar days of submission to NARA fell off by 46 percent. The reason for this drop was that many of the schedules we focused on in FY 2000 were email and word processing schedules that were submitted in standard formats, requiring shorter review times. This created an unusual spike in the numbers in FY 2000, which in FY 2001 dropped back to a level more consistent with FY 1999 progress.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We have set our FY 2002 target for closing out records schedules at a median time of 240 calendar days or less. However, we are undertaking an effort to reduce our oldest records schedules - those that are already more than 2 years old. During this effort our median time will significantly increase because of the age of the records schedules.


STRATEGIC GOAL 2: ACCESS

ESSENTIAL EVIDENCE WILL BE EASY TO ACCESS REGARDLESS OF WHERE IT IS OR WHERE USERS ARE FOR AS LONG AS NEEDED.

Long Range Performance Targets 2.1. By 2007, access to records and services and customer satisfaction levels meet or exceed NARA's published standards.
 
  2.2. By 2007, 70 percent of NARA services are available online.
 
  2.3. By 2007, 95 percent of NARA archival holdings are described at the series or collection level in an online catalog.
 
  2.4. By 2003, ISOO will develop a uniform sampling system for collecting information about classification activity within the executive branch.
 
  2.5. By 2004, NARA will review and declassify 100 percent of archival holdings more than 25 years old for which NARA has been granted declassification authority and responsibility for their review by the originating agency.
 
  2.6. By 2007, 10 percent of records of a two-term President or 15 percent of records for a one-term President are open and available for research at the end of the 5-year post-Presidential period specified in the Presidential Records Act.
 
  2.7. By 2007, 90 percent of all NHPRC-assisted projects produce results promised in grant applications approved by the Commission.

FY 2001 Resources Available to Meet This Goal: $120,326,000; 2,207 FTE

2.1 CUSTOMER SERVICE

FY 2001 Objectives   Meet or exceed NARA's published standards for access to records and services, as noted below:
  complete
  • 80 percent of written requests are answered within 10 working days;
  not closed out
  • 80 percent of Freedom of Information Act requests are completed within 20 working days;
  not closed out
  • 25 percent of requests for military service records at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis are answered within 10 working days;
  not closed out
  • 95 percent of items requested in our research rooms are furnished within 1 hour of request or of scheduled pull time;
  complete
  • 99 percent of customers with appointments have records waiting at the appointed time;
  complete
  • 90 percent of Federal agency records reference requests in Federal records centers are ready when promised to the customer;
  complete
  • 99 percent of records center shipments to Federal agencies are the records they requested;
  complete
  • 90 percent of public education programs and workshops are rated by their users as "excellent" or "very good."
 
  complete Complete duplication and distribution of 1930 census film copies to NARA facilities and rental program. Complete procurement and installation of equipment and furniture.
 
Results  We answered 93 percent of written requests within 10 working days.
 
"I received all 20 pages of the bankruptcy papers. I can now buy the house of my dreams!"  We completed 29 percent of all FOIA requests within 20 working days.
 
   We answered 5 percent of military service records requests within 10 working days.
 
"You were very nice and patient with me and my mom. I probably could not have earned my merit badge without you."  We furnished 93 percent of requested items within 1 hour of request or of scheduled pull time.
 
   We furnished records at the appointed time for 99 percent of customers with appointments.
 
   We had ready 93 percent of Federal agency reference requests when promised to the customer.
 
   Of the records we shipped to Federal agencies, 100 percent were the records agencies requested.
 
"The teacher workshop made me want to improve as an educator and citizen!"  Our users rated 96 percent of our public education programs and workshops as "excellent" or "very good."
 
"I am delighted to see my tax dollars working so efficiently!"  We completed microfilm duplication of 100 percent of the 1930 census and distributed to NARA facilities and microfilm rental program.
 
   We procured and installed the furniture and equipment for the April 1, 2002, census opening.

Explanation

Although we did complete FOIA requests for NARA operational records and Federal archival records within the 20-day time period 82 percent of the time, we experienced an overall performance gap in our FOIA response time. Most of our FOIA requests (83 percent) are for veterans' records at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. Only 22 percent of these requests were answered within 20 working days. We also fell short on our goal of answering requests for military service records within 10 days. Service backlogs at the center are what prompted us to undertake a Business Process Reengineering project there. We are in process of implementing several key initiatives that will improve our response time and expect to see faster processing of FOIA requests and military service requests as a result.

While we fell short of achieving our objective of furnishing items requested in our research rooms within 1 hour of request or of the scheduled pull time, we made significant progress over last year, furnishing 21 percent more items within the requested time.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Percent of written requests answered within 10 working days. 88.56 91.92 93.03
Percent of Freedom of Information Act requests completed within 20 working days. 34.58 26.86 27.56
Percent of requests for military service records at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) in St. Louis answered within 10 working days. 7.07 2.88 4.21
Percent of items requested in our research rooms furnished within 1 hour of request or scheduled pull time. 94.43 89.07 93.24
Percent of customers with appointments for whom records are waiting at the appointed time. 99.69 99.39 99.64
Percent of Federal agency reference requests in Federal records centers that are ready when promised to the customer. 81.12 78.84 92.69
Percent of records center shipments to Federal agencies are the records they requested. -- -- 99.99
Percent of education programs, workshops, training courses rated by participants as "excellent" or "very good." 90.22 95.33 96.50

Trend Analysis

We received about 900 fewer FOIA requests in FY 2001 than we did in FY 2000, and we completed about 1,100 fewer than last year. We are beginning to see some improvements due to an ongoing Business Process Reengineering project at the National Personnel Records Center, as shown by our performance on FOIA requests completed within 20 working days improving 11 percent since last year. We have also made significant progress in our backlog of unanswered requests.

Demand for items in our research rooms has increased by 100 percent since FY 1999. We furnished 15.1 percent more requests in FY 2001 than last year. Despite a drop off in visitors at our National Archives Building after September 11, 2001, overall we saw the number of visitors to our research rooms increase slightly throughout the year.

On the measure to provide routine Federal agency reference requests to records center activities in regional records services facilities within 24 hours or when requested, process changes and better-clarified procedures that we implemented last year yielded significantly better performance this year. Also, some of our FY 2000 resources went to providing records recovery services for several thousand cubic feet of wet records after a fire at the Washington National Records Center. This additional work contributed to our not meeting our target last year. This year our workload increased 61 percent over last year. Despite this increase, we were able to exceed our target this year.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

While we do not expect to meet our FOIA target or our military service requests target in FY 2002, with continued business process improvements at the National Personnel Records Center, we expect to see significant improvement in our processing time and reduction in our backlog of requests over the next two to three years.

We expect to see continued growth in the number of visitors to our research rooms, particularly with the release of the 1930 census on April 1, 2002. While we expect to see growth in the number of records requested in our research rooms, we are working hard to ensure sufficient staffing to meet these demands and to fully achieve our goal of providing 95 percent of these requests within 1 hour of request or of the scheduled pull time. We have also improved our data collection method for requests in our archival research rooms, moving from a random sampling method to automated tracking of actual data in FY 2002. This change will improve the accuracy of our data. Also, FY 2002 will be the first year that FOIA cycle time data will be based on actual performance, rather than estimated cycle times, improving the accuracy of our FOIA data.

2.2 ONLINE SERVICES

FY 2001 Objective not closed out Determine the measurement methodology and establish the baseline for the percentage of NARA services available online.
 
Results  Preliminary measurement methodology developed and baseline for NARA services available online proposed.

Explanation

We developed a new methodology to measure the number of NARA services that are available online to our customers regardless of their location. We established a baseline of services and determined the numbers that are currently online. This metric was developed in coordination with our Government Paperwork Elimination Act (GPEA) plan, and will reflect the products that are deployed under GPEA. While we did not meet our internal goal for completing the development of this metric by the end of FY 2001, we are on track for implementing the metric with our first quarter FY 2002 data as planned.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Public user sessions on NARA's web site (in thousands) 7,271.8 10,096.2 16,105.9
Percent of NARA services available online. -- -- 24

Trend Analysis

We continue to see growth in the use of our web site. These numbers will continue to increase as more information and services are made available electronically and also as technology reaches more people.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We will meet our target for FY 2002.

2.3 ONLINE CATALOG

FY 2001 Objectives not closed out Complete development of the Archival Research Catalog.
 
  not closed out Migrate 100 percent of NARA Archival Information Locator descriptions to the Archival Research Catalog.
 
  complete Describe 10 percent of our nationwide archival holdings in the Archival Research Catalog.
 
  complete Provide online access to select accessioned electronic records.
 
  not closed out Install computer terminals capable of accessing the Archival Research Catalog in 100 percent of our research rooms nationwide.
 
Results  We described 13 percent of our nationwide archival holdings in an online catalog.
 
"NAIL is a marvelous resource, for which you are to be highly commended."  We achieved online access to select accessioned data files; completed development of a prototype Access to Archival Databases system; and awarded a pilot and production contract.
 
   We developed the policy for installation and use of computer terminals in NARA research rooms.

Explanation

We made steady progress in moving toward our goal of development of a new Archival Research Catalog (ARC). We did not approve the catalog for final testing because customization of the commercial software, a necessary precursor to final testing, was not completed. Insufficient resources, combined with changing requirements for the software customization and web interface, contributed to the delays. We have restructured the ARC schedule and added the necessary resources to complete the project.

We did not complete installation of computer terminals in all of our research rooms because not all of the rooms were outfitted with the technical and infrastructure requirements necessary to provide connections to the Internet. Also, we needed to resolve issues regarding approved uses of the computers by the public (e.g., email and Internet access), and network security requirements needed to be finalized.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Percent of nationwide archival holdings described in an online catalog. 8.4 13.9 13.2
Cubic feet of archival holdings 2,834,522 2,767,668 2,915,133
Cubic feet of archival holdings described in an online catalog. 236,756 385,909 385,909

Trend Analysis

No additional holdings were described in the online catalog during FY 2001. The numbers reflect the percentage already described in the prototype catalog as a proportion of our overall holdings. The percentage online decreased because our holdings increased.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

Development of ARC will be completed in FY 2002 and all descriptions will be migrated to the new system. The catalog will be publicly available by the end of the year. We will also install computer terminals capable of accessing ARC and other Internet research sites in all of our public research rooms nationwide.

2.4 CLASSIFICATION

FY 2001 Objectives not closed out Conduct on-site reviews of all major executive branch security classification programs.
 
  not closed out Identify a sampling method or methods that result in data of uniform credibility for all agencies that sample their classification activity.
 
Results  We conducted 3 on-site reviews of major executive branch security classification programs.

Explanation

Issues related to reporting security classification program data contained in electronic systems complicated the work planned for defining a sampling method resulting in data of uniform credibility for all agencies that sample their classification activity. Program reviews were completed at the Department of State, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Department of the Treasury. Two other planned reviews were postponed until FY 2002 when the remainder of the 12 new staff members for the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) are expected to be on board.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We expect to redefine the parameters of the plan to identify a sampling method resulting in data of uniform credibility for all agencies that sample their classification activity. We will complete the ISOO reorganization, hiring of new staff (including the ISOO director), and undertake planned program reviews.

2.5 DECLASSIFICATION

FY 2001 Objectives not closed out Review 50 percent of Federal records and 25 percent of Presidential materials more than 25 years old in NARA's custody that are not being reviewed by the originating agency and for which NARA has declassification authority.
 
  complete Scan 300,000 pages of Presidential archival materials eligible for declassification review as part of the Remote Archives Capture project.
 
Results  We reviewed 9 percent of Federal records in our custody more than 25 years old that were not being reviewed by the originating agency and for which we had declassification authority.
 
   We reviewed 21 percent of Presidential materials in our custody more than 25 years old that were not being reviewed by the originating agency and for which we had declassification authority.
 
   We scanned 321,800 pages of Presidential materials eligible for declassification review as part of the Remote Archives Capture project.

Explanation

We completed a wall-to-wall inventory of Federal classified stacks to set a new baseline for the universe of Federal classified records. Removing duplicate and withdrawn records reduced our Federal backlog count significantly. However, the Federal records we did review in FY 2001 were exclusively intelligence records, which are much slower to review because of the subject and because of the large number of withdrawals. Because we are limited to a page-by-page review, we will continue to show much slower progress than we did when Executive Order 12958 first went into effect.

We fell slightly short of reaching our target of reviewing 25 percent of the Presidential materials backlog because of several staffing shortfalls. Because the work requires highly trained, security-cleared individuals, staff vacancies were difficult to fill.

We corrected some of our FY 2000 Presidential records data this year after we discovered that we were inadvertently including records in the count for which we did not have declassification authority. Federal records were unaffected by this correction.

We installed a new database management system for tracking withdrawn items with scanning and storage capabilities. This has improved our internal ability to track information about our classified and declassified records, allowing us to electronically scan requested documents, input data about the documents, redact documents, and provide redacted copies of scanned documents to researchers.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Backlog of Federal records at start of year (in thousands) 20,000.0 52,864.2 25,029.0
Annual percentage of Federal records NARA reviewed that are more than 25 years old for which NARA has declassification authority. 52 15 9
Backlog of Presidential materials at start of year (in thousands) 1,500.0 1,978.4 1,562.4
Annual percentage of Presidential records NARA reviewed that are more than 25 years old for which NARA has declassification authority. 48 21 21
Annual number of Federal pages reviewed (in thousands) 11,030.6 8,051.5 2,129.0
Annual number of Federal pages declassified (in thousands) 8,466.8 3,697.3 806.5
Annual number of Presidential pages reviewed (in thousands) 713.0 416.0 322.0
Annual number of Presidential pages declassified (in thousands) 304.8 291.0 218.8
Annual number of Presidential pages scanned. 351.2 160.0 321.8
Annual number of Presidential pages released. 291.1 285.1 206.8

Trend Analysis

The number of Federal records we were able to review dropped by 80 percent since FY 1999, most of that drop (74 percent) occurring this year. The reason that most of the drop occurred this year is because we worked exclusively on intelligence records, which required significantly more time to review. Likewise, the proportion of Federal pages reviewed to the number we declassified dropped from 77 percent in FY 1999 to 38 percent in FY 2001. This is directly attributable to the high sensitivity of the records we were reviewing in FY 2001. We expect this negative trend to continue as NARA and equity-holding agencies re-assess records in the post-September 11 environment.

The number of Presidential pages we were able to review dropped off by 55 percent since FY 1999, about half of that drop occurring in FY 2001. This was mostly because of some staffing shortfalls that we are working to correct. Still, we declassified proportionally more of what we reviewed, from 43 percent in FY 1999 to 67 percent in FY 2001. We also increased by 101 percent the number of Presidential pages that we scanned as part of the Remote Archives Capture project, specifically for Ford, Carter, and Reagan Library records.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We will continue our partnerships with several agencies that are providing declassification support, however we will not meet our FY 2002 targets. We expect to review and declassify fewer pages in FY 2002 because of the need to reassess open records in response to the war on terrorism.

2.6 PRESIDENTIAL RECORDS

FY 2001 Objective complete Prepare, facilitate, and gather inventories for 33 percent of the incumbent Presidential and Vice Presidential records and artifacts to be transferred to NARA.
 
  complete Transfer 100 percent of Clinton Administration Presidential and Vice Presidential records and artifacts to NARA.
 
  complete Process 1 percent of the Presidential records for opening January 20, 2006.
 
Results  We prepared or acquired inventories for 40 percent of the Presidential and Vice Presidential records and artifacts in the custody of the White House.
 
   We transferred 100 percent of Clinton Administration Presidential and Vice Presidential records and artifacts to NARA.
 
   We processed 1 percent of the Presidential records for opening January 20, 2006.

Explanation and FY 2002 Performance Plan

We completed item level inventories for 100 percent of the artifacts in the Clinton Presidential collection. These items account for 40 percent of the total record and artifact collection for this administration. We processed 290 cubic feet (1 percent) out of 28,925 cubic feet of textual Clinton Presidential records. Future progress in processing and inventorying the records may be hindered by an unusually large number of special access requests or subpoenas for the records of the Clinton Administration.

2.7 NHPRC GRANTS

FY 2001 Objective complete Produce results promised in grant applications approved by the Commission for 84 percent of all NHPRC-assisted projects.
 
Results

"Because of an NHPRC regrant, on September 11 we [NY State Archives staff] were able to quickly identify the 72 historical records repositories below 14th Street in Manhattan and to immediately send teams. . .to provide assistance."
 We produced the results promised in grant applications approved by the Commission for 91 percent of NHPRC-assisted projects.
Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Number of NHPRC-assisted projects completed. 100 67 115
Number of NHPRC-assisted projects that produced the results promised. 89 63 105
Percent of NHPRC-assisted projects that produced the results promised. 89.0 94.0 91.3

Trend Analysis We completed 72 percent more grants this year than last year. The percent of projects producing the results promised fell off slightly from last year. This was due to our tightening the metric criteria so that projects were judged successful if they met 70 percent or more of their criteria.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation The types of grants we fund may influence the results. Certain grants, such as research and development grants, have a higher risk of not achieving their intended results. If the number of grants in these areas increases, as the Commission's priorities encourage, then a steady or low percentage of successful grants may be a justifiable target. We need to see what trends develop in the data over the next few years to determine if our target levels are realistic and whether our measurement methodology is meaningful.


STRATEGIC GOAL 3: SPACE AND PRESERVATION

ALL RECORDS WILL BE PRESERVED IN APPROPRIATE SPACE FOR USE AS LONG AS NEEDED.

Long Range Performance Targets

3.1. By 2007, 90 percent of NARA holdings are in appropriate space.

3.2. By 2007, 50 percent of NARA's at-risk archival holdings are appropriately treated or are housed so as to retard further deterioration.

3.3. By 2007, 97 percent of NARA's electronic holdings are preserved and accessible, regardless of their original format.

FY 2001 Resources Available to Meet This Goal: $172,224,000; 351 FTE

3.1 HOLDINGS IN APPROPRIATE SPACE

FY 2001 Objectives complete Complete final design for the renovation of the National Archives Building.
 
  complete Complete move of archival records from the Washington National Records Center to the National Archives at College Park.
 
  complete Complete two pre-renovation construction projects in the National Archives Building.
 
  complete Award National Archives Building renovation construction contract.
 
  complete Complete fabrication of seven encasements (including two spare encasements) for the Charters of Freedom.
 
  complete Re-encase page three of the Constitution.
 
  not closed out Complete design for new Southeast Regional Archives.
 
  complete Move records from White House to temporary facility for Clinton Presidential Materials Project.
 
  complete Complete construction at the Truman Library.
 
  complete Complete design for museum renovations at the Eisenhower Library.
 
  complete Complete design for Roosevelt Library visitor center.
 
Results  We completed the final design for the renovation of the National Archives Building.
 
   We completed the move of archival records from the Washington National Records Center to the National Archives at College Park.
 
   We completed two pre-renovation construction projects in the National Archives Building:

    -- Construction of moat offices.
    -- Demolition of shelving and steel decks on six floors.

 
   We awarded a construction contract for the renovation of the National Archives Building.
 
"We are enshrining these documents for future ages..."  We completed fabrication of seven encasements.
 
   We re-encased page three of the Constitution.
 
   We prepared a draft environmental assessment for Southeast Regional Archives and completed the 35 percent design.
 
   We moved records from the White House to a temporary facility for Clinton Presidential Materials Project.
 
"A wonderful renovation and a powerful history lesson in these exhibits."  We completed construction at the Truman Library.
   We completed the design for museum renovations at the Eisenhower Library.
 
   We completed the design for the Roosevelt Library visitor center.

Explanation and FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We continued negotiations with the State of Georgia and Clayton College and State University for a new Southeast regional archives facility. Decisions made included how to best use the entire site, the location of the NARA building, and the final configuration of the building. Those negotiations were finally completed in October 2001, but because the negotiations took longer than planned, we were only able to complete a 35 percent design for the facility. The 100 percent design will be completed and we expect to award a construction contract for the facility in FY 2002. We undertook an environmental assessment and expect the final report in FY 2002.

3.2 PRESERVATION OF AT-RISK HOLDINGS

FY 2001 Objectives complete Appropriately treat or house 30 percent of NARA's at-risk archival holdings so as to retard further deterioration.
 
  complete Transfer all remaining acetate-based records in the Washington, DC, area to cold storage.
 
  not closed out Complete duplication of Air Force Flight Records and prepare 1,000 cubic feet of Final Pay Vouchers & Payrolls for a reformatting contract at the National Personnel Records Center.
 
Results  We performed required preservation action on 32 percent of identified at-risk previously accessioned Federal records in the Washington, DC, area.
 
   We transferred our remaining acetate-based records in the Washington, DC, area to cold storage.
 
   We hired 15 preservation staff for the National Personnel Records Center.
 
   We completed duplication of 14,500 reels of Air Force Flight Records microfilm, and we prepared 267 cubic feet of Final Pay Vouchers and Payrolls for a reformatting contract at the National Personnel Records Center.

Explanation

While we successfully completed duplication of 14,500 reels of Air Force Flight Records microfilm, we were unable to reach our goal to prepare 1,000 cubic feet of Final Pay Vouchers and Payrolls for a reformatting contract. Contributing factors included delays in the hiring process to fully staff the preservation team and a number of unanticipated research and arrangement tasks that had to be incorporated into the holdings maintenance and document preparation procedures. This occurred because the records were in worse condition than our initial assessments indicated.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Start of year backlog (cubic feet). 161,478 156,507 167,154
Number of records treated this year (cubic feet). 4,971 35,133 26,403
Percent of cumulative backlog treated this year. 3.1 22.4 15.8
Total percent of cumulative backlog ever treated. 3.1 24.8 32.1

Trend Analysis

We preserved an additional 7 percent of identified at-risk previously accessioned records, bringing the percent of records treated to 32 percent. We treated 53 percent of those records (14,079 cubic feet) by putting them in cold storage. Excluding cold storage records, we treated about 11,700 cubic feet by other preservation methods, slightly less than we treated last year. This drop in our rate of preservation was anticipated last year, and we expect to see it slow further in FY 2002 as preservation methods other than cold storage are employed. The two largest groups of records worked on in FY 2001 were Navy deck logs from 1801 to 1915, and patent case files of the Patent and Trademark Office. Work also continued on Holocaust/World War II era records identified as high use and at-risk by the NARA members of the Nazi War Crimes and Japanese Imperial Government Records Interagency Working Group.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We expect that because of the condition of Final Pay Vouchers and Payrolls records, the work to prepare these for a reformatting contract will require either additional time or resources to complete. We plan to award a contract for reformatting these records in FY 2002.

3.3 PRESERVATION OF ELECTRONIC RECORDS

FY 2001 Objective complete Preserve and make accessible 40 percent of electronic records in NARA holdings, regardless of their original format.
 
  complete Complete analysis of requirements and achieve capability to preserve raster and vector files from geographic information systems.
 
  not closed out Preserve and make accessible 100 percent of Bush and Reagan electronic holdings, regardless of their original format.
 
  not closed out Complete concept of operations and draft requirements for the Electronic Records Archives.
 
Results  We preserved and made accessible 97 percent of NARA's electronic holdings, regardless of their original format.
 
   We completed analysis of requirements and achieved the capability to preserve raster and vector files from geographic information systems.
 
   GAO performed a risk assessment of the Electronic Records Archives program.
 
   We managed and preserved 99 percent of Bush and Reagan electronic records.
 
   We accessioned and preserved 3 terabytes of data from Federal agency web site "snapshots."

Explanation

We fell just short of reaching our 100 percent target of preserving and making accessible all Bush and Reagan electronic holdings. The remaining 29,000 logical data records will be completed shortly. A logical data record is a set of data processed as a unit by a computer system or application, independent of its physical environment. An example would be a word processing document, an email message, a row in a table in a relational database, etc.

At the request of the House of Representatives, the General Accounting Office (GAO) is performing a program-level risk identification and assessment of the Electronic Records Archives (ERA) program, with particular focus on NARA's program management capabilities and interdependencies across program functional areas, activities, and stakeholder organizations (findings are expected in FY 2002). We moved our activities to complete a concept of operations and draft requirements for ERA into FY 2002, because of the need to focus on developing the infrastructure needed to manage a program of this size and complexity.

Trend Data FY 2001
Number of logical data records in NARA's custody. 2,344,502,905
Number logical data records managed and preserved. 2,271,747,425
Number of Bush and Reagan logical data records. 2,191,872
Number of Bush and Reagan logical data records managed and preserved. 2,162,967
Percent of NARA's electronic holdings preserved and accessible, regardless of their original format. 98.7

Trend Analysis

There is no comparable data available in FY 2000 because we changed the definition of this metric. In previous years we counted "electronic files." Now we count "logical data records." This change enables us to compare different types of electronic records and will provide a more reliable standard of measurement.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

Due to the huge influx of electronic records expected in FY 2002 and future years, we have lowered our targets to reflect our projected performance against a rapidly expanding universe.


STRATEGIC GOAL 4: INFRASTRUCTURE

NARA'S CAPABILITIES FOR MAKING CHANGES NECESSARY TO REALIZE OUR VISION WILL CONTINUOUSLY EXPAND.

Long Range Performance Targets 4.1. By 2003, 100 percent of employee performance plans and 100 percent of staff development plans are linked to strategic outcomes.

4.2. By 2007, the percentages of NARA employees in underrepresented groups match their respective availability levels in the Civilian Labor Force.

4.3. By 2007, NARA will accept 100 percent of the legal documents submitted electronically for publication in the Federal Register.

4.4. By 2007, NARANET will have a 95-percent-effective computer and communications infrastructure.

FY 2001 Resources Available to Meet This Goal: Goal 4 supports goals 1 through 3. Resources available are included in the totals for those goals.

4.1 PERFORMANCE AND DEVELOPMENT PLANS

FY 2001 Objectives complete Issue written guidance to managers on linking employee performance plans to strategic outcomes.
 
  complete Train managers in linking employee performance plans to strategic outcomes.
 
  not closed out Link 50 percent of employee performance plans to strategic outcomes.
 
Results  We developed a model to link individual employee performance plans to our Strategic Plan.
 
   We linked 48 percent of employee performance plans to strategic outcomes.

Explanation

We implemented our methodology for linking each employee's performance plan to NARA's Strategic Plan. We issued guidance and trained managers and supervisors. At 48 percent, we fell slightly short of our goal of linking 50 percent of employee performance plans.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We anticipate meeting our goal of linking all performance plans with our Strategic Plan by the end of FY 2002. We will begin to roll out a new process for creating individual development plans for all employees and linking those plans to strategic outcomes in FY 2002.

4.2 EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

FY 2001 Objectives not closed out Provide formal diversity training to 100 percent of NARA managers and employees.
 
  not closed out Ensure the percentages of NARA employees in underrepresented groups match 50 percent of their respective availability levels in the Civilian Labor Force.
 
  complete Increase the percentage of people in underrepresented groups in pools of applicants from which to select for positions in Grades 13 and above, over the percentage in FY 2000.
 
Results  We provided diversity training to 27 percent of NARA managers and employees.
 
   We employed people in underrepresented groups so that our percentages matched at least 50 percent of the national averages in 5 out of 6 underrepresented groups.
 
   We increased the percentage of people in underrepresented groups in pools of applicants for positions at Grades 13 and above from 63 percent to 74 percent.

Explanation

The increased number of staff who have received diversity training reflects staff who were trained in the last quarter of FY 2000 but missed the cut-off date for inclusion in our performance measurement reporting system. No additional diversity training occurred in FY 2001. We changed our methodology for delivering diversity training to staff, and will resume training in FY 2002.

We met our objective of employing people in underrepresented groups for 5 out of 6 underrepresented groups. However, the lack of well-qualified applicants from certain underrepresented groups continues to be a problem (see detailed data in Appendix A).

A problem we have with measuring applicants from underrepresented groups is that we must rely on each applicant's voluntary self-identification as a member of an underrepresented group on NARA's Applicant Background Survey. Some applicants choose not to identify their backgrounds or not to return the survey forms. We have increased our efforts this year to collect the Applicant Background Survey from every applicant. Also, we have increased our use of professional organizations' web sites to post vacancies, and this increased exposure may be helping to bring in more diverse applicants.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Percent of employees who have received diversity training. 6 19 27
Percent of Civilian Labor Force rate used to determine if underrepresented groups met employment target.     50.0
Underrepresented groups of employees meeting target (checkmark indicates target met or exceeded)      
    --Women
    --Black
    --Hispanics      
    --Asian American/Pacific Islander
    --American Indian/Alaskan Native
    --Targeted disability
Number of applicant pools for positions in Grades 13 and above. 21 24 60
Number of pools for positions in Grades 13 and above that had self-identified applicants in protected classes. 10 15 45
Percent of applicant pools for positions at Grades 13 and above that contain people in underrepresented groups. 47.1 62.5 75.0

Trend Analysis

While we are getting more applicants from underrepresented groups in our applicant pools than in previous years, we are still not able to meet our target for Hispanic employees.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

NARA is a member of the Office of Personnel Management's newly established Interagency Task Force, composed of agency officials from each major Federal department and independent agency. This task force was established to help provide agencies with the framework necessary for implementing plans to improve the representation of Hispanics. The task force meets semi-annually to cover topics such as reviewing best practices in strategic human resources management planning, providing advice on increasing Hispanic community involvement, and discussing the elimination of barriers to employment for Hispanics. It is NARA's intent to draw ideas and plans from these meetings that will address solutions to this gap in employment.  

We will employ a new delivery system for diversity training that will improve attendance, and we expect to have 50 percent of NARA's employees trained in diversity awareness by the end of FY 2002. We have also improved our data collection system for measuring applicants in underrepresented groups, which will help ensure that we are able to collect a more complete set of data next year.

4.3 FEDERAL REGISTER PRODUCTION

FY 2001 Objectives complete Complete business process improvement (BPI) study and cost estimates for the implementation of an electronic editing and publishing system.
 
Results  We completed the BPI study, and design and cost estimates for an electronic editing and publishing system were delivered.
 
"Real-time, online access to the Federal Register. . . one of the most democratic, citizen-empowering things to have happened in recent years."  We prepared a statement of work to purchase, install, and test an electronic editing and publishing system.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We expect to be fully successful in our efforts to purchase, install, and begin testing an electronic editing and publishing system.

4.4 COMPUTERS AND COMMUNICATIONS

FY 2001 Objectives complete Increase overall performance to 88 percent effectiveness by making substantial improvements in the network infrastructure.
 
Results  We increased our overall network effectiveness to 96.5 percent.
Trend Data FY 2000 FY 2001
Percent of overall NARANET effectiveness 94 96.5
--Percent of network availability 99.9 99.9
--Percent of user support services effectiveness 92.0 92.2
--Percent of service delivery to the desktop effectiveness 90.1 97.5

Trend Analysis

We have consistently exceeded our annual targets.

FY 2002 Performance Plan Evaluation

We realize that to maintain our performance levels for these services we must continuously improve. To that end we must continue to keep hardware and software up to date, keep pace with increased calls for user support services by effectively managing our user support tools and processes, and improve our infrastructure by installing new servers and fiber optic cabling. With these efforts, we expect the overall network effectiveness of NARANET to remain high. In addition, we are making a substantial upgrade to our nationwide telephone system, which will facilitate NARA communications across the country.


Appendix A: Outputs

This appendix contains supplemental output information on selected objectives in this report. Objectives not listed below have no significant supplemental data.

2.1 Meet or exceed NARA's published standards for access to records and services.

Trend Data FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001
Archival written requests answered. 105,422 107,370 113,990
Archival written requests answered within 10 working days. 93,365 98,696 106,051
Military records requests answered. 1,248,652 1,150,436 1,085,319
Military records requests answered within 10 working days. 88,321 32,105 49,399
Items furnished in our research rooms. 523,810 910,744 1,048,582
Items furnished within one hour of the request or scheduled pull time. 494,634 811,265 977,775
Federal agency customers with appointments. 32,535 38,342 41,530
Federal agency customers with appointments who have records waiting at requested time. 32,435 38,109 41,381
Routine Federal agency records center reference requests answered. 10,252,193 9,286,882 14,967,471
Routine Federal agency records center reference requests answered that were ready when promised. 6,970,721 7,322,300 13,874,295
Federal agency record center shipments were the records requested. -- -- 14,967,361
Public education programs and workshops rated by users. 348 407 372
Public education programs and workshops rated by users as "excellent" or "very good." 314 388 359
Number of FOIA requests answered. 6,911 8,751 7,638
Number of FOIA requests answered within 20 working days. 2,595 2,466 2,271

4.2  Provide formal diversity training to 100 percent of NARA managers and employees.

  • 3,017 permanent and temporary employees.
  • 804 received diversity training (27 percent).

4.2  Employ and recruit percentages of people in underrepresented groups so that NARA's percentages match 50 percent of the Civilian Labor Force percentages of people in underrepresented groups.
The categories where we met or exceeded the objective are checked below. Our target for employing people with targeted disabilities was 1.5 percent. The numbers in the table below are based on permanent employees only.

Number of Employees By
Underrepresented Group
FY 1999 Actual (Percent) FY 2000 Actual (Percent) FY 2001 Actual (Percent) FY 2001 Target (Percent) Civilian Labor Force Availability (Percent)*
 1,488 Women 36.5 38.8 54.9 22.9 45.7
 875 Black 8.3 8.6 32.3 5.2 10.3
       41 Hispanic 0.5 0.5 1.5 4.1 8.1
 60 Asian American/Pacific Islander 0.7 0.7 2.2 1.4 2.8
 10 American Indian/Alaskan Native 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.6
 54 Targeted Disabilities N/A N/A 2.0 1.5 N/A

* Civilian Labor Force availability is based on census data. At the time NARA set its targets for this metric, the CLF rates were still based on 1990 census data. We will revise our targets when new CLF data is available from the 2000 census.

Appendix B: Program Evaluations

Strategic Goal 1: Essential Evidence

Office of the Inspector General, OIG Report 01-07, Evaluation of NARA's Records Disposal and Concurrence Process, July 18, 2001.

    The Inspector General reviewed NARA's records disposal and concurrence process and made 11 recommendations to the Office of Regional Records Services for improving this process. All recommendations are scheduled to be completed in FY 2002.

Strategic Goal 2: Access

General Accounting Office, GAO-01-599, National Personnel Records Center: Plan Needed to Show How Timeliness Goal Will be Achieved, May 2001.

    GAO conducted a review of NARA's actions to improve response time to veterans' requests for records and recommended that NARA develop a plan to show what is needed to meet its FY 2005 goal.

Office of Regional Records Services, National Personnel Records Center: Plan to Meet FY 2005 Timeliness Goal, August 10, 2001.

    NARA developed a detailed plan for meeting our FY 2005 goal to improve our response time to veterans' requests for records in response to GAO-01-599. The plan describes 9 initiatives that are being implemented between 2001 and 2004.

Office of Inspector General, OIG Report 01-15, Audit of NARA Web Privacy Policies and Practices, August 2, 2001.

    The OIG found that NARA is taking necessary actions to protect the privacy of individuals who access NARA web sites, but that our web privacy policies and practices needed improvements in some areas. The OIG made 6 recommendations. Two are completed, and the remainder are scheduled to be completed in FY 2002.

Office of Inspector General, Audit Memorandum 01-08, Review of Billing System for the Reimbursable Program, March 29, 2001.

    The OIG conducted a review of NARA's billing system for the records center's reimbursable program. They reviewed cost data, audit trails and documentation of billing transactions, and billing policies and procedures. They determined that these data were accurate and no recommendations were made.

Strategic Goal 4: Infrastructure

Office of the Inspector General, OIG Report 01-05, Audit of the NARA Systems Security Program, March 28, 2001.

    The Inspector General conducted a review of NARA's information system security program and made 4 recommendations to the Office of Human Resources and Information Services for developing an entity-wide systems security program. All recommendations are scheduled to be completed in FY 2002.

Policy and Communications Staff, NARA Implementation of the Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act, June 30, 2001.

    In compliance with the FAIR Act, NARA compiled information about the activities performed by each office and submitted it to OMB and the Congress. OMB approved the inventory and published a notice of availability in the Federal Register on September 27, 2001 . NARA made the inventory available to the public as required for 30 days via our website, fax-on-demand, mail, email, and fax. We received no challenges to the inventory. The Archivist reviewed the inventory and decided that of the 31 items on the inventory, 21 will be retained in-house. Of the 10 remaining functions, 5 are undergoing significant changes in their work processes and will be reassessed when these changes are completed, and 5 are subject to cost comparison or direct conversion requirements of A-76. One activity was reviewed during FY 2001 and a determination was made to retain this in-house.

Multi-Goal Evaluations

Office of the Inspector General, OIG Report 01-02, Evaluation of the Accuracy of NARA's Performance Measurement Data, March 2, 2001.

    The Inspector General reviewed 10 out of 31 numeric performance objectives in NARA's FY 2000 Annual Performance Plan and commended NARA for the improvements made in the quality and reliability of the data since the last evaluation. The Inspector General also made 2 recommendations to improve specific metric reliability. NARA implemented these recommendations during FY 2001.

Office of the Inspector General, OIG Memorandum 01-16, Evaluation of NARA's Management Control Program for Fiscal Year 2000, September 13, 2001.

    The Inspector General reviewed NARA assurance statements and related management control documents and determined that NARA complied with the intentions of the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act (FMFIA), OMB Circular A-123, and OMB Circular A-127. No material weakness in the management control program for FY 2000 were found, and no recommendations were made.

Office of Presidential Libraries, Program Review, April 17-20, 2001.

    The office conducted a program review at the George Bush Library in College Station, Texas. Twenty-one recommendations were made for improvements, and deadlines were given for responding. All but one item for which a response was due on or before September 30, 2001, have been completed or addressed. The remaining item will be completed in FY 2002.

Office of Presidential Libraries, Program Review, June 12-15, 2001.

    The office conducted a program review at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts. Forty-one recommendations were made for improvements, and deadlines were given for responding. All items for which a response was due on or before September 30, 2001, have been completed or addressed.

    Office of Presidential Libraries, Program Review, June 27-29, 2001.

      The office conducted a program review at the Clinton Presidential Materials Project in Little Rock, Arkansas. Fifteen recommendations were made for improvement, and deadlines were given for responding. Of these items, none required a response on or before September 30, 2001.

    Office of Presidential Libraries, Program Review, July 1-September 30, 2001.

      The office conducted a program review at the Nixon Presidential Materials Staff in College Park, Maryland. Twenty recommendations were made for improvement, and deadlines were given for responding. Of these items, none required a response on or before September 30, 2001.

    Office of Presidential Libraries, Program Review, July 17-20, 2001.

      The office conducted a program review at the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library in Abilene, Kansas. Fourteen recommendations were made for improvement, and deadlines were given for responding. All items for which a response was due on or before September 30, 2001, have been completed or addressed.
    • For more information about these reports, contact the Policy and Communications Staff on 301-837-1850 or by email at vision@nara.gov.
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