Washington, DC Area Events

October 2016
Washington, DC, Area Events

You can watch some of our programs live on YouTube. Look for the US National Archives YouTube Channel logo in a program description and click it to watch live or catch up later.

Live captioning will be available online and in the William G. McGowan Theater. If you require an alternative or additional accommodation for an event (such as a downloadable transcript or a sign language interpreter), please send an email to public.program@nara.gov or call 202-357-5000 in advance.

 

 

Locations, Hours, and Contact Information

All events listed in the calendar are free unless noted. Reservations for McGowan Theater programs are not required but are recommended. Use the new online event registration system from the National Archives Foundation to reserve your seats:
1. Register at www.archivesfoundation.org/events/
2. Print your email confirmation and bring it with you.
3. To reserve by phone, call 202-357-6814. Walk-ins without reservations will be admitted, depending on available seats.

For McGowan Theater programs, use the Special Events Entrance on Constitution Avenue. The doors to the building will open 45 minutes prior to the start of the program.

Current Exhibitions

Lost and Found

  • National Archives at Washington, DC: 202-357-5023
  • National Archives at College Park: 301-837-2900

 

Courtesy, Equal Means Equal

Tuesday, October 4, at 7 p.m.
William G. McGowan Theater
Equal Means Equal

Through real-life stories and precedent-setting legal cases, the documentary film looks at how women are treated in the United States today, and presents a compelling and persuasive argument for the urgency of ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment. The film argues that outdated and discriminatory attitudes inform and influence issues such as workplace harassment, domestic violence, foster care, healthcare, the judicial system, and the inadequacy of present laws that claim to protect women. Following the film screening will be a discussion with Kamala Lopez, Director, Equal Means Equal, Eleanor Smeal, President and a Co-founder of the Feminist Majority Foundation; Bettina Hager, DC Director of the ERA Coalition and Fund for Women’s Equality; and Bridget Brown, Executive Director, National Association of Workforce Development Professionals. Presented in partnership with the Alice Paul Institute. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Amending America.

 

Friday, October 7, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater & US National Archives YouTube Channel
The Wedding Heard ’Round the World: America’s First Gay Marriage

On September 3, 1971, Michael McConnell and Jack Baker exchanged vows in the first legal same-sex wedding in the United States. Repercussions were immediate:  Michael’s job offer at the University of Minnesota was rescinded, leading him to wage a battle against job discrimination with the help of the Minnesota Civil Liberties Union. The couple eventually reached the U.S. Supreme Court with two precedent-setting cases. Their remarkable story is told here for the first time—a unique account of the passion and energy of the gay liberation movement in the sixties and seventies. A book signing follows the program. Presented in collaboration with Stonewall@NARA, the National Archives LGBTQ employee Affinity Group.

 

Tuesday, October 11, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater & US National Archives YouTube Channel
American Treasures: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address

In American Treasures, Stephen Puleo charts the little-known journeys of the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address. The book weaves in exciting stories of freedom under fire—from the Declaration and Constitution smuggled out of Washington days before the British burned the capital in 1814, to their covert relocation during WWII—crafting a sweeping history of a nation united to preserve its definition of democracy. A book signing follows the program.

 

Wednesday, October 12, at 10-11 a.m.
Boeing Learning Center
Story Time in the ReSource Room for Pre-schoolers and Adults

Story time designed for 3-5 year olds and accompanying adults. Children practice their listening skills, participate in group activities, and create a craft. October’s theme is Halloween in the White House.

 

Thursday, October 13, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater
The Year of the Tiger—JFK 1962

Featuring archival images, film footage, and audio recordings from the National Archives and other sources, this new documentary chronicles the October 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. Following the screening, Director Joe Looby will discuss the film and answer audience questions.

 

Congressman Bobby Rush

Wednesday, October 19, at 7 p.m.
William G. McGowan Theater & US National Archives YouTube Channel
Revolutionary Movements Then and Now: Black Power and Black Lives Matter

Fifty years ago, Stokely Carmichael first publicly uttered the phrase “Black Power” at a rally during the March Against Fear in Mississippi. Four months later, the Black Panther Party was founded in Oakland, California kicking off the movement to secure empowerment and improve the standing of black people in the United States. Today, Black Lives Matter has become a movement advocating for dignity, justice, and respect in the wake of social and judicial tragedies occurring in America. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Black Power movement, Say it Loud!, the African American Employee Affinity Group presents a panel discussion of distinguished guests from revolutionary movements of the past and present. Moderated by journalist & author A’Lelia Bundles. Panelists include Congressman Bobby Rush (D-IL), co-founder of the Illnois chapter of the Black Panther Party; Ericka Brown-Abram, author of Black Panther Princess and the daughter of former chair of the Black Panther Party, Elaine Brown; Alicia Garza, co-founder, Black Lives Matter; Jakobi Williams, associate professor of history at Indiana University-Bloomington and author of From the Bullet to the Ballot; and Princess Black, activist and historian. An open reception follows where audience members and panelists may continue the discussion amongst historically significant records relating to social movements in America. Presented in partnership with Say It Loud!, the National Archives African American Employee Affinity Group.

Saturday, October 22, noon-4 p.m.
Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance)
“Help! I’m Stuck” Genealogy Consultation

Not sure where to begin? Has a genealogical problem stumped you? Sign up for first-come, first-served 20-minute appointments with archivist Claire Kluskens at the Microfilm Research desk.

 

October 26 & 27, starting daily at 10 a.m. EDT
ONLINE AT www.archives.gov/calendar/genealogy-fair
National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair

October 26 - Watch entire day on YouTube US National Archives YouTube Channel
October 27 - Watch entire day on YouTube US National Archives YouTube Channel
Participate in our biggest genealogy event of the year! The National Archives will host a free, live, two-day virtual Genealogy Fair via webcast on YouTube, offering advice on family history research for all skill levels on Federal records, including basic genealogical research, underutilized records, census, Department of State documents, and military records. Sessions include genealogical research guidance on how to use traditional and online resources and tools.  Session videos and handouts are available free of charge during and after the event. For the schedule, handouts, and participation instructions, visit the Virtual Genealogy Fair web page at www.archives.gov/calendar/genealogy-fair.

 

Friday, October 28, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater & US National Archives YouTube Channel
The Quartermaster: Montgomery C. Meigs, Lincoln’s General, Master Builder of the Union Army

In The Quartermaster, Robert O’Harrow Jr. brings to life the legendary Union Army General Montgomery C. Meigs, known by Lincoln, his Cabinet, and General as the architect of the Union victory. A book signing follows the program.

 

 

 

 

 

The ReSource Room is open Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Exhibitions

Records of Rights” explores how Americans have worked to realize their nation’s ideals of freedom. The exhibit features the 1297 Magna Carta, on permanent loan from David M. Rubenstein. The 2001 USA PATRIOT Act is on display as our Landmark Document. Its goals were to improve information sharing among intelligence and law enforcement agencies and to increase the Government’s power to monitor terrorism suspects’ communications. David M. Rubenstein Gallery

1297 Magna Carta
The 1297 Magna Carta, on permanent loan from David M. Rubenstein, is featured in the “Records of Rights” exhibit. David M. Rubenstein Gallery

Rotunda

  • Declaration of Independence
  • Constitution
  • Bill of Rights

The Charters of Freedom: Our Nation’s Founding Documents” takes a fresh look at the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Using historical documents from the holdings of the National Archives, we answer two key questions about the Charters: "How did they happen?" and "Why are they important?" Rotunda

The Public Vaults” invites visitors into virtual stack areas to discover historic documents, films, maps, and photographs from the National Archives. A rare print on parchment of the Declaration of Independence–made from the original copperplate engraved by William J. Stone in 1823—is on display for a limited time. Courtesy of David M. Rubenstein


Special Exhibition in Washington, DC

Amending America
Only 27 times—out of more than 11,000 proposals—have Americans reached consensus to amend the Constitution. A new exhibit, “Amending America,” reveals the stories behind why some proposed amendments successfully became part of the Constitution, while others failed to gain enough support. Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery, March 11, 2016–September 4, 2017

The “Amending America” exhibit and related programs are presented in part by AT&T, HISTORY®, the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family, Seedlings Foundation, and the National Archives Foundation.

Featured Documents on Display in Washington, DC

Featured Document Display: Celebrating the Opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture
An act of Congress established the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) on December 16, 2003. However, efforts to create a national museum dedicated to African American history and culture date to the early 20th century. In celebration of the opening of the NMAAHC, a 1927 pamphlet showing an early design for an African American memorial museum, and the Act that was ultimately passed in 2003 will be on display. East Rotunda Gallery, through
November 9


Special Exhibition in College Park, Maryland

Auditorium Lobby at the National Archives Research Center:

"The Long View" features digitally produced facsimiles of historic panoramic photographs from the Still Picture holdings.

Motorcycle Corps, Army Motor Service - Under Command of J. S. Berryman. US Capitol. Wash., DC. Jan. 26, 1919, By R. S. Clements. Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs (165-PP-60-47)

The exhibit not only showcases the wide variety of panoramic techniques, but also includes National Archives records such as cartographic maps and patent drawings that relate to the photographs. Thirty-four panoramas and other records are on display and span the period from 1864 to 1997.
See more panoramas online


Online Exhibits

Dozens of exhibits can be experienced online. Visit Now!

Records of Rights
Explore records of the National Archives documenting the ongoing struggle of Americans to define, attain, and protect their rights.

Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage
Startling evidence of the once vibrant Jewish life in Iraq came to light in May 2003—over 2,700 books and tens of thousands of documents were discovered in the flooded basement of the Iraqi intelligence headquarters by a U.S. Army team.

To the Brink: JFK and the Cuban Missile Crisis
An exhibit marking the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

What's Cooking Uncle Sam? logo “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?”
Unearth the stories and personalities behind the increasingly complex programs and legislation that affect what we eat. Learn about the Government’s extraordinary efforts, successes, and failures to change our eating habits. Find out why the Government wanted us to “Eat the Carp,” “Share the Meat,” and “Know Our Onions.” There are over 100 original records in the exhibit—including folk songs, war posters, educational films, and even seed packets. From Revolutionary War rations to Cold War cultural exchanges, discover the multiple ways that food has occupied the hearts and minds of Americans and their Government.
Online exhibit

You will be able to watch our archived programs on Ustream for a limited time while the landing page is still active. www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives


Locations, Hours, and Contact Information

The National Archives Museum
Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

For details, see the Visitor's Guide or visit the National Archives Museum.

Exhibit Hours:

  • 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
  • Last admission is at 5 p.m.
  • Open every day except Thanksgiving and December 25.

Admission free.

All events listed in the calendar are free unless noted. Reservations for McGowan Theater programs are not required but are recommended. Use the new online event registration system from the National Archives Foundation to reserve your seats:
1. Register at www.archivesfoundation.org/events/
2. Print your email confirmation and bring it with you.
3.To reserve by phone, call 202-357-6814. Walk-ins without reservations will be admitted, depending on available seats.

For McGowan Theater programs, use the Special Events Entrance on Constitution Avenue. The doors to the building will open 45 minutes prior to the start of the program.

For reservations, special accommodations, or to be placed on the mailing list, call 202-357-5000, or toll free at 1-877-874-7616, or email public.program@nara.gov.

Museum Visit Reservations: To make reservations to visit the museum, especially during the height of the tourist season and holiday periods use online reservations.

National Archives Store: Offers publications and gift items in support of National Archives exhibitions, education, and public programs. A 15% discount is offered on program-related books. Telephone 202-357-5271.


The National Archives Research Center
700 Penn. Ave., NW, Washington, DC and 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD.

Research Hours for both locations:

  • Monday - Saturday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
  • Closed on Federal holidays. Please note that all National Archives research rooms will be closed on Monday, October 10 for Columbus Day.

Check the Washington, DC and College Park, MD location information for records pull times and other important details.

Call 202-357-5450 for a docent-led guided tour.

wheelchair icon TDD: 301-837-0482. The National Archives is fully accessible. To request an accommodation (such as a sign language interpreter) for a public program, please call 202-357-5000, or toll free at 1-877-874-7616, or email public.program@nara.gov at least two weeks prior to the event.


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The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
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