Genealogy Fair
National Archives Building, Washington, DC

groupFeatured Speakers


Kathryn Allamong Jacob, Ph.D., will speak on Memory, Monuments, and the National Archives and also give a walking tour, Testament to Union: Embodying the Civil War in Marble and Bronz.

She is the Johanna-Maria Frankel Curator of Manuscripts at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University.

Jacob is the author of two books on Washington history: Capital Elites: High Society in Washington, DC, After the Civil War (Smithsonian Press, 1994) and Testament to Union: Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC. (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998).

She has also written for Smithsonian Magazine on sculptor Vinnie Ream and the “King of the Lobby,” Sam Ward, who is the subject of her next book.


Donn Roe, Ph.D., will speak on The Struggle to Desegregate the Public Schools in the District of Columbia.

He is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Howard University and teaches courses in U.S. and Public History.

Roe joined the staff after serving as an adjunct lecturer in the Department of History from 1995 to 2002 and completing a career spanning 26 years as an archivist and subject area expert in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch at the National Archives.

Visiting the National Archives Building Event Press Release Nationwide Genealogy Workshop Schedule

Genealogy Fair

Wednesday, April 19, 2006
National Archives Building, Research Center Lobby

This event is free and open to the public.


calendar and clockEvent Schedule

Match your interests with our itinerary by choosing from three session topics, or attend an ongoing demonstration.

Topic tracks:

  1. General Genealogy
  2. D.C. Genealogy Records
  3. D.C.—The City

9:15-10:00 a.m.

  1. Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives
  2. Using Senate Nominations Papers (1789-1946) for Genealogy Research
  3. D.C. Building Permits

10:15-11:15 a.m.

  1. The Archival Research Catalog (ARC): NARA's Online Door to the Archives
  2. Records of Congress for Genealogists
  3. Finding that Nugget of Information on District of Columbia Citizens in the Records of the District Court for the District of Columbia

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

  1. Ancestry Library & HeritageQuest
  2. Preserving Our Capital Heritage: Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau
  3. Memory, Monuments, and the National Archives

12:30 — Raffle

12:30-1:30 p.m. — Lunch

1:30-2:30 p.m.

  1. Access to Archival Databases (AAD): Using Electronic Records on the Web for Your Family Tree
  2. District of Columbia Private Claims in Congress
  3. Testaments to Union: Embodying the Civil War in Marble and Bronze (Part I)

2:45-3:45 p.m.

  1. ALIC Resources including Government Publications
  2. The Struggle to Desegregate the Public Schools in the District of Columbia
  3. Testaments to Union: Embodying the Civil War in Marble and Bronze (Part II) Walking tour.

3:45 p.m. — Raffle


Ongoing Demonstrations

  • Access to Archival Databases (AAD)
  • Archival Research Catalog (ARC)
  • Book Shop
  • eVetRecs (Requesting St. Louis military records online)
  • Help, I’m Stuck: Getting Started
  • Handouts and Special Databases
  • Online Genealogy Tutorial
  • Preservation
  • Special Media
  • You and Your Digital Camera

Event Press Release

Visiting the National Archives Building (How to Get There, Museum Hours, etc.)


infoWorkshop Descriptions

GENERAL GENEALOGY


(All General Genealogy workshops conducted in Room G-30, the Library)

9:15-10:00 a.m.
Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives (Claire Prechtel-Kluskens and Rebecca Sorrell).   This session will include tips for beginning and organizing your genealogical research, a brief overview on the resources available at NARA, and what researchers should expect when they visit.

10:15-11:15 a.m.
The Archival Research Catalog (ARC) - NARA's Online Door to the Archives (Rebecca Warlow and Pamela Wright).  This lecture will cover an introduction for users to NARA’s online catalog of its holdings, the Archival Research Catalog (ARC).  The talk will focus on how to use ARC to find NARA records, search tips, and how ARC may be different from other online resources.

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Ancestry Library & HeritageQuest (Carolyn Gilliam and Nancy Wing). This lecture will cover an introduction for researchers to the Ancestry Library and Heritage Quest databases.  Researchers will learn how to locate people in the U.S. Census for Washington DC, as well as how to locate supporting books and articles about the Washington DC area.

1:30-2:30 p.m.
Access to Archival Databases (AAD) - Using Electronic Records on the Web for Your Family Tree (Lynn Goodsell and Daniel Law). This lecture will examine a survey of electronic records involving genealogy on the National Archives website and practical instructions for researching them.

2:45-3:45 p.m.
ALIC Resources Including Government Publications (Carolyn Gilliam and Nancy Wing).  This presentation will be an introduction for researchers to printed materials that can supplement and enhance their research.  Materials to be covered include the United States Serial Set, the Washington DC City Directory, books describing the history and architecture of the District of Columbia, census indices, mortality schedules, and government publications.


DC GENEALOGY RECORDS


(All DC Genealogy workshops conducted in Room G-24)

9:15-10:00 a.m.
Using Senate Nominations Papers (1789-1946) for Genealogy Research (John Deeben).  The lecture will focus on the nature, arrangement, and genealogical value of presidential nominations from the records of the United States Senate.  Nominations relating to the District of Columbia will be highlighted, including the files of a few prominent District residents.

10:15-11:15 a.m.
Records of Congress for Genealogists (Rodney Ross).  This session focuses on records of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.  Topics will include the Congressional Serial Set as well as records of the committees on the District of Columbia of the House and the Senate.  Outwardly the talk will be on those subjects, but post-talk questions may be on any Congressionally-related topic.  Special emphasis will be on web-available resources.

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Preserving Our Capital Heritage: Records of the Freedmen's Bureau (Reginald Washington).  The lecture will include a discussion of Freedmen's Bureau records for the District of Columbia and their importance and use for genealogical research, as well as the NARA’s efforts to microfilm previously un-filmed records.

1:30-2:30 p.m.
District of Columbia Private Claims in Congress (John Deeben).  The lecture will cover private claims of DC residents from the Accompanying Papers File of the U.S. House of Representatives.  The claims process will be described, along with the various types of claims submitted, including Civil War pension and indemnity claims, and petitions relating to various DC institutions.

2:45-3:45 p.m.
The Struggle to Desegregate the Public Schools in the District of Columbia (Donn Roe, PhD.).  This lecture will examine the long, controversial, and circuitous route leading to Bolling v. Sharpe, the Supreme Court case that desegregated public schools in Washington, DC.


DC—THE CITY


(All DC-The City workshops conducted in Room 501)

9:15-10:00 a.m.
DC Building Permits (William Creech).  The government of the District of Columbia began keeping building permits in 1877.  The National Archives has custody of the DC building permits and associated indexes for the period of February 17, 1877 through September 7, 1949.  This discussion will focus on these holdings and issues concerning uses for research.

10:15-11:15 a.m.
Finding that Nugget of Information on District of Columbia Citizens in the Records of the District Court for the District of Columbia (Robert Ellis).  This presentation will examine a brief history of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. This Federal court served as a local county or state court for the District of Columbia. Robert Ellis will speak on how to locate court records relating to residents of the District of Colombia and how to use the court records for local District of Columbia history.

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Memory, Monuments, and the National Archives (Kathryn Allamong Jacob, PhD.).  Efforts to control collective memory and efforts to erect public monuments are tightly woven together.  Records at the National Archives help unravel the story of the passionate debates that raged behind the scenes as veterans, politicians, champions of the fine arts, and hired lobbyists wrestled to control the politics of memory through the Civil War monuments that dot the nation's capital.

1:30-3:45 p.m.
Walking Tour: Testaments to Union: Embodying the Civil War in Marble and Bronze (Kathryn Allamong Jacob).  Within an easy walk of the National Archives nearly a dozen monuments testify to the individual and collective efforts of the military to win the Civil War and preserve the Union.  Embodying bravery, sacrifice, vision, patriotism, these monuments also speak to efforts of partisan groups to shape and control the memory of the war beyond the generation that fought it.

LUNCH 12:30-1:30 p.m.

RAFFLES 12:30 p.m. and 3:45 p.m.

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