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historical image of P.H. Dorsett
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P. H. Dorsett preparing plant specimens on a makeshift table in 1925 on an expedition to Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Sumatra, and Java (Indonesia).

National Archives, Records of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering

historical image of seed distribution building
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Packeting floor of the Seed Distribution Building located in Washington, DC, 1905.

National Archives, Records of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering

historical image of educational exhibit
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“The Pig Cafeteria” was one of many exhibits created to educate farmers.

National Archives, Records of the Secretary of Agriculture

historical image of family listening to the radio
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Beginning in 1926, farmers could tune in to USDA weather forecasts, market reports, and programs like The United States Radio Farm School and Farm Flashes.

National Archives, Records of the Extension Service

historical image of government worker
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The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) of 1933 paid farmers subsidies to keep some crops off the market.

National Archives, Records of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics

historical photo of Charles Willie
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Charles Wille was sent to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in 1915 for breaking the oleomargarine laws.

National Archives, Records of the Bureau of Prisons

historical image of women shopping
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These stylish ladies demonstrated what $1.34 bought in 1918 and 1945, thanks to the Office of Price Control.

National Archives, Records of the Office of Price Adminsitration

historical poster that reads Get Your Farm in the Fight! Use Conservation Methods for Bigger Yields Now!
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World War II poster, 1942

National Archives, Records of the Secretary of Agriculture

historical image of family picnicking
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Many urbanites held on to the agrarian myth—the belief that the family farm stood for all that is pure and good in America—but demanded the cheap food that large agribusiness could supply.

National Archives, Records of the United States Information Agency

historical image of wheat fields
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The result of mechanical and biological revolutions in agriculture was increased productivity, reduced labor, greater specialization, and lower costs to consumers.

National Archives, Records of the Environmental Protection Agency

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