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historical image of home economist in laboratory
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This nutritionist wears lab whites appropriate to the scientific approach of the home economist.

National Archives, Records of the Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics

historical image of researcher working in laboratory
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Wilbur O. Atwater with some of the equipment used in his pioneering metabolic studies.

National Archives, Records of the Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics

historical poster
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Some of us might like to reinstate this food guide from World War II because butter has its own food group.

National Archives, Records of the Office of Government Reports

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historical document
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This 1911 Bureau of Fisheries poster encouraged Americans to eat carp. The fish was introduced to American waters in 1877 and quickly proliferated.

National Archives, Publications of the U.S. Government

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historical photo that reads This Dairy Product has merit because it is 1. Economical 2. Quickly made 3. Nutritious 4. Attractive 5. Delicious
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Home economists helped standardize a meat, potato, and vegetable as the typical American meal. It was easier to calculate the nutritional value of simple ingredients.

National Archives, Records of the Extension Service

historical photo of store display
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This inventive store display ca. 1917 -18 promotes the potato as a “good soldier” and recommends people eat it “uniform and all.”

National Archives, Records of the United States Food Administration

historical poster that reads For Pep and Vigor - Vitamin Donuts - Each donut fortified with a minimum of 25 units of Vitamin B1
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The Doughnut Corporation sought endorsement from the Nutrition Division of the War Food Administration for its Vitamin Doughnuts campaign.

National Archives, Records of the Agricultural Marketing Service

historical poster that reads Know Your Onions - Food is Ammunition - Don’t Waste It - Make ALL the food go ALL the way
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World War II poster, ca. 1942.

National Archives, Records of the Office of Government Reports

historical poster
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During World War I, the Food Administration under Herbert Hoover promoted “Meatless Mondays.” This poster suggests cottage cheese as a protein substitute.

National Archives, Records of the United States Food Administration

Download a PDF Transcript (requires Adobe Reader)

historical poster that reads Uncle Sam says GARDEN to cut food costs - Ask the U.S. Department of Agriculture Washington, D.C. for a free bulletin on gardening - it's food for thought
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With canned goods in short supply during World Wars I and II, people ate more fresh fruit and vegetables—many from their own back yards.

National Archives, Records of the Office of War Information

historical photo of child with ration card
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Point Rationing was so easy, even young children could do it—or so this 1943 photograph suggests.

National Archives, Records of the Office of War Information

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