Press/Journalists
Press Release
March 1, 2001
April and May Public Programs at the National Archives

Washington, DC . . . In April and May, the National Archives and Records Administration presents public programs covering a wide variety of topics including the Roosevelt family, National Archives exhibitions "American Originals" and "Picturing the Century," space surveillance, and Presidential elections.

The programs are free and open to the public and will take place at the National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW and at the National Archives at College Park, located at 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD. The public may verify times and dates by calling the National Archives public events line at (202) 501-5000. TDD users may call (202) 501-5404.

April

Tuesday, April 3-Judicial Review
William E. Nelson will discuss Marbury v. Madison: The Origins and Legacy of Judicial Review. He reveals how Chief Justice Marshall deftly avoided a dangerous political confrontation between the executive and judicial branches by upholding the rule of law. He also shows how Marshall managed to shore up the Court's prestige and power rather than have it serve partisan political agendas. Noon. Room 105. Seating is limited; call 202-208-7345 for reservations.

Tuesday, April 10-The Roosevelt Family
James MacGregor Burns will discuss his latest book, The Three Roosevelts: How Patrician Reformers Changed America. Burns and historian Susan Dunn illuminate how Theodore's vision and example inspired the careers of his fifth cousin Franklin and niece Eleanor. The leadership of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt reshaped the political landscape of our nation, from TR's Square Deal to FDR's New Deal to Eleanor Roosevelt's pivotal role in the early days of the United Nations. Noon. Room 105. Seating is limited; call 202-208-7345 for reservations.

Wednesday, April 11- American Originals series
The 2001 edition of the popular changing exhibit "American Originals" is the subject of today's lecture. A new selection of the nation's most significant and compelling documents was installed in the Rotunda last month. Curator Stacey Bredhoff will present an illustrated lecture featuring many of the documents included in that display, providing glimpses of George Washington, Susan B. Anthony, Martin Luther King Jr., Lyndon Baines Johnson, and many other towering figures in our history. The audience may view the exhibit following the lecture. Noon. Room 105.

Tuesday, April 17- Space Surveillance
Jeffrey Richelson will discuss America's Space Sentinels: DSP Satellites and National Security, a groundbreaking account of a little-known defense program. Drawing on previously classified documents and on interviews with key participants, Richelson provides a wealth of new information: the use of Defense Support Program (DSP) satellites for detecting intermediate-range missiles, false alarms generated following the attempted assassination of President Reagan, and the role of DSP in Desert Storm. 7 P.M. Room 105. Seating is limited; call 202-208-7345 for reservations.

Wednesday, April 18- Earth Day/Picturing the Century series
Environmental Images from EPA's DOCUMERICA Project. Bruce Bustard, curator of NARA's "Picturing the Century: One Hundred Years of Photography from the National Archives" exhibit, will discuss images of nature and the environment taken by photographers who worked for the Environmental Protection Agency's DOCUMERICA photography project of the 1970s. The audience may view "Picturing the Century" immediately after the lecture. Noon. Room 105. May

Tuesday, May 8- Time in America
Ian Bartky discusses Selling the True Time: Nineteenth-Century Timekeeping in America, the first comprehensive history of timekeeping in America. Before the railroads adopted Standard Railway Time in 1883, timekeeping was entirely a local matter, and America lacked a uniform system to coordinate times and public activities. Despite the efforts of astronomers and congressional supporters, the railroads' success with their own system blocked legislation for a national time system until the First World War. Noon. Room 105. Seating is limited; call 202-208-7345.

Wednesday, May 9- Abraham Lincoln series
Lincoln, Gradualism, and the Emancipation Proclamation. Abraham Lincoln has gone down in history as the Great Emancipator for issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. But according to Howard University professor Edna Greene Medford, a proclamation of emancipation "was not the ideal way for him." What Lincoln wanted was a plan of gradual, compensated emancipation, such as the scheme he favored for the loyal border states. Medford is co-author of a forthcoming book on the Emancipation Proclamation in social, legal, and pictorial perspective. Co-sponsored by the Abraham Lincoln Institute of the Mid-Atlantic. Noon. Room 105.

Tuesday, May 22 - Presidential Elections and the Media
Robert Shogan draws on the lessons of seven presidential elections in Bad News: Where the Press Goes Wrong in the Making of the President. Shogan has covered the political scene from Washington for Newsweek and the Los Angeles Times. Noon and 7 P.M. Room 105. Seating is limited; call 202-208-7345 for reservations.

College Park, MD Events

Monday, April 9- The Roosevelt Family
The Three Roosevelts: How Patrician Reformers Changed America. James MacGregor Burns discusses his new book. See April 10 listing for the National Archives Building for description. Noon. Lecture Room D. Call 202-208-7345 for reservations.

Monday, May 7- Time in America
Selling the True Time: Nineteenth-Century Timekeeping in America. Ian Bartky discusses his new book. See May 8 listing for the National Archives Building for description. Noon. Lecture Room D. Call 202-208-7345 for reservations. For PRESS information, contact the National Archives Public Affairs staff at (301) 837-1700.

To verify the date and times of the programs, the public should call the Public Events Line at: 202-501-5000, or view the Calendar of Events on the web at: www.archives.gov/about_us/calendar_of_events/ .

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