Press/Journalists

Press Release
April 2, 2008

Electoral College Debate at the National Archives on May 21

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Washington, DC…In the wake of the Presidential election of 2000, the value of the Electoral College has been questioned and debated. Does the Founding Fathers’ vision still apply today, or should this system be reevaluated? On Wednesday, May 21, at 7 p.m. the National Archives presents a distinguished panel moderated by journalist David Broder to debate both sides of the issue. The program will be held in the William G. McGowan Theater of the National Archives Building.

From May 1 through May 26, original documents relating to the unique workings of the American Electoral College will be displayed in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building.

Panelists include Judith Best, political science professor at the State University of New York, Cortland, and author of The Choice of the People? Debating the Electoral College; George Edwards III, political science professor at Texas A & M University and author of Why the Electoral College is Bad for America; Gordon Wood, professor of history at Brown University; Ed Goeas, president and CEO of The Terrance Group; and Mark Mellman, president and CEO of The Mellman Group. Archivist Allen Weinstein will offer opening remarks, and Raymond Mosley, Director of the Office of the Federal Register, will discuss how this office coordinates the functions of the Electoral College.

The National Archives Building in Washington, DC, is located on the National Mall at Constitution Avenue and 7th Street, NW and is fully accessible. The program and exhibit are free and open to the public. Seating for this program is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information or to request an accommodation (e.g., sign language interpreter) for a public program, please e-mail public.program@nara.gov or call (202) 357-5000.

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For Press information, contact the National Archives Public Affairs staff at 202-357-5300.

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