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Press Release
January 29, 2014

National Archives Holds Special Program on Muhammad Ali February 5

Program and screening celebrate Black History Month and new Record of Rights exhibit

Washington, DC…On Wednesday, February 5, at 7 p.m., the National Archives presents a special program and screening of The Trials of Muhammad Ali, an unconventional sports documentary that explores the extraordinary and complex life of Muhammad Ali outside the boxing ring. The filmís director, Bill Siegel, will introduce the film and answer audience questions

This event, held in celebration of Black History Month and the new "Records of Rights" permanent exhibit, is free and open to the public, and will be held in the William G. McGowan Theater of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Attendees should use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue at 7th St., NW

About The Trials of Muhammad Ali (2013; 94 minutes)

The Trials of Muhammad Ali, winner of the International Documentary Associationís 2013 ABC News Video Source Award for best use of archival film in a documentary, investigates Muhammad Aliís life outside the boxing ring. From joining the controversial Nation of Islam and changing his name from Cassius Clay to Muhammad Ali, to his refusal to serve in the Vietnam War in the name of protesting racial inequality, to his global humanitarian work, Muhammad Ali remains an inspiring and controversial figure. Outspoken and passionate in his beliefs, Ali found himself in the center of America's controversies over race, religion, and war. Academy Award®-nominated director Bill Siegel examines how one of the most celebrated sports champions of the 20th century risked his fame and fortune to follow his faith and conscience.

About the new permanent "Records of Rights" Exhibit

The new permanent exhibit at the National Archives, "Records of Rights," uses original documents, photographs, facsimiles, videos, and interactive exhibits to explore how Americans have worked to realize the ideals of freedom enshrined in our nationís founding documents and how they have debated issues such as citizenship, free speech, voting rights, and equal opportunity. Exploring many stories–and showcasing the drive for civil rights for African Americans, women, and immigrants–the new exhibition chronicles the past and current generations whose efforts to secure equality under the law have shaped the country we live in today.

The National Archives is fully accessible. To verify the date and times of the programs, call 202-357-5000, or view the Calendar of Events online.

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For Press information, contact the National Archives Public Affairs Staff at 202-357-5300.

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