Prologue Magazine
1895
Prof. J. Franklin Jameson of Brown University urged the American Historical Association to promote use of source materials. Prof. J. Franklin Jameson of Brown University was a strong advocate for the preservation and use of federal records. [Jameson, 64-NA-1472]
1921
A Commerce Department fire on January 10, 1921, destroyed the 1890 federal census records. The U.S. Commerce Building, ca. 1920 (left), and a truck ready to move surviving census records in 1922 after the fire at the building a year before.
1931
On September 9, 1931, ground was broken for the archives building in Washington, D.C. The Center Market, site of the future national archives, in the years before it was demolished.
1931
On September 9, 1931, ground was broken for the archives building in Washington, D.C. President Herbert Hoover celebrated the laying of the building's cornerstone on February 20, 1933.
1931
On September 9, 1931, ground was broken for the archives building in Washington, D.C. The Archives building in the midst of construction on March 1, 1934.
1934
R.D.W. Conner became the first Archivist of the United States. R.D.W. Conner, first Archivist, October 10, 1934–September 15, 1941. [RG 64-NA-1-37]
1935
By November 1935, the National Archives Building was occupied by 265 employees. WPA workers flatten and mount Indian Bureau maps in the National Archives in August 1938. [image: map room 64-NA-214]
1936
In June 1936 the Archives accessioned first 58,800 cu. ft. of records, mostly from the Veterans Administration and U.S. Food Administration. Caption: Workers at the archives push a cart of Veterans Administration records into a vacuum chamber for fumigation in June 1936. [image of loading VA Admin. records 64-NA-77]
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