Washington, DC Area

July and August 2016

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July/August 2013
Washington, DC, Area Events

 

Program Highlights

  • Annual July 4th Celebration
    Celebrate July 4th at the National Archives with a dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence and family activities. ( July 4)
  • Space Days
    Explore hands-on space-age family activities see archival film footage about the space program in the 1970s ( July 18, 19, 20)
  • 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington
    See a new digitally restored version of the 1964 film The March. ( August 26, 27 28)
  • Women’s Equality Day
    For the anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we present a panel discussion related to women’s participation in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. ( August 24)
  • Noontime Lectures
    Hear the authors of Junius and Albert’s Adventures in the Confederacy: A Civil War ( July 11); The Battle Hymn of the Republic: A Biography of the Song That Marches On ( July 16); Prohibition Gangsters: The Rise and Fall of a Bad Generation ( July 24); and Shirley Jones: A Memoir ( July 25)
  • Know Your Records
    Get started with the Introduction to Genealogy workshop ( July 3, August 7); learn how to navigate Archives.gov ( July 10, 24, 18), ( August 15); and go “Beyond the Basics” to learn about nonpopulation censuses ( July 17) and the Freedman’s Bank ( August 21).

 

Locations, Hours, and Contact Information

All events listed in the calendar are free unless noted; reservations are not required unless noted. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. For McGowan Theater programs, the doors to the building will open 30 minutes prior to the start of the program. Use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue.

Current Exhibitions

 

Wednesday, July 3, at 11 a.m.
Room G-25, Research Center ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)
Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives

Learn how to do basic genealogical research using Federal records at the National Archives. Lectures take place on the first Wednesday of the month.

Annual July 4th Celebration
Celebrate July 4th at the National Archives Building on the Constitution Avenue steps between 7th and 9th Streets. We commemorate this historic day with with Steve Scully of C-SPAN as emcee and our annual dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence. Other 4th of July Activities.

 

10 a.m.–11 a.m.
Declaration of Independence Reading Ceremony

  • Presentation of colors by the Continental Color Guard*
  • Performance by the Fife and Drum Corps*
  • Remarks by Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero
  • Dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence by special guests including Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Ned Hector (portrayed by historical reenactors)

*Continental Color Guard and Fife and Drum Corps provided by U.S. 3rd Infantry, the Old Guard

11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Inside the National Archives Building, Boeing Learning Center

  • Take part in hands-on family activities, including storytime and crafts.
  • Between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., meet Revolutionary figures: Abigail and John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, Ned Hector, Thomas Jefferson, and George Washington.

July 4th at the National Archives is presented in partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives and is made possible in part by the generous support of Lead Sponsor John Hancock Financial and Dykema.

Wednesday, July 10, at 9:30 a.m.
Library ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)
Genealogy Workshop: Using National Archives Online Resources

Nancy Wing teaches a 90-minute, hands-on workshop on how to navigate Archives.gov. If you don’t know where to start or have gotten lost in your research, this workshop will help you understand how to use Archives.gov to further your research. Registration required; classes are limited to seven seats. Email Nancy.Wing@nara.gov.

Wednesday, July 24, at 9:30 a.m.
Repeated in the library ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)

Thursday, July 11, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater
Junius and Albert’s Adventures in the Confederacy: A Civil War Odyssey

Peter Carlson recounts the story of New York Tribune correspondents Junius Browne and Albert Richardson, who were captured at the Battle of Vicksburg and spent 20 months in prisons before escaping. They traveled for 340 miles through snow and across mountains aided by pro-Union guerillas to make their way to Union territory. regions of North Carolina. A book signing will follow the program.

 

Tuesday, July 16, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater
The Battle Hymn of the Republic: A Biography of the Song That Marches On

Perhaps no other song has held such a profoundly significant place in America’s history and cultural memory than the “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” In this illustrated program with musical examples, John Stauffer and Benjamin Soskis show how this Civil War tune has become an anthem for subsequent causes. A book signing will follow the program.

Wednesday, July 17, at 11 a.m.
Room G-25, Research Center ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)
“Beyond the Basics” Genealogy: Nonpopulation Censuses

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a lecture on nonpopulation censuses by Constance Potter (all skill levels welcome).

Thursday, July 18, at 11 a.m.
Room G-25, Research Center ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)
Genealogy Lecture: National Archives Online Resources

Nancy Wing shows you tips on how to navigate Archives.gov for your genealogy research. No registration required.

Thursday, August 15, at 11 a.m.
Repeated in the Room G-25, Research Center ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)

July 18–20, 11 a.m.–3 p.m.
Boeing Learning Center & McGowan Theater
Space Days at the National Archives

Explore hands-on space-age family activities connected to our display in the Public Vaults on the space program under Presidents Nixon and Ford. At noon each day in the theater we will screen archival film footage from the National Archives.

Wednesday, July 24, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater
Prohibition Gangsters: The Rise and Fall of a Bad Generation

After the 18th Amendment outlawed the “manufacture, sale, or transport of intoxicating liquors,” a group of young criminals with immigrant backgrounds came to power. Marc Mappen strips away the myths and legends of Prohibition-era gangsters and describes the lives they lived and the battles they fought. A book signing will follow the program.

Thursday, July 25, at 12:30 p.m.
William G. McGowan Theater
Shirley Jones: A Memoir

Shirley Jones is an Oscar-winning American film legend of the first order, having starred in Oklahoma!, Carousel, and The Music Man long before her role on the iconic 1970s series The Partridge Family. Today she discusses her memoir, her legendary Hollywood co-stars, and her interactions with the cast of The Partridge Family. A book signing follows the program. Presented in conjunction with the exhibit “Searching for the Seventies.”

August 2013

Wednesday, August 7, at 11 a.m.
Room G-25, Research Center ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)
Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives

Learn how to do basic genealogical research using Federal records at the National Archives. Lectures take place on the first Wednesday of the month.

Wednesday, August 21, at 11 a.m.
Room G-25, Research Center ( Penn. Ave. Entrance)
“Beyond the Basics” Genealogy: Freedman’s Bank

Increase your archival research skills at the National Archives with a lecture on the Freedman’s Bank by Damani Davis (all skill levels welcome).

Saturday, August 24, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater
From Words to Action:The Women’s Perspective on Rights in America

Today, in partnership with the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum and the National Park Service, the National Archives hosts a panel discussion including Page Harrington, Executive Director, Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, and Dr. Joy Kinard, Central District Manager, National Capital Parks-East. The panel will share and discuss rarely-seen historic documents of local leaders and organizations related to women’s participation in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.

Presented in commemoration of Women’s Equality Day and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

August 26, 27 & 28 at noon
William G. McGowan Theater
From the Vaults: The March

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, we present screenings of a new digitally restored version of James Blue’s 1964 film produced for the U.S. Information Agency. The March documents the event from its preparations through Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. (40 minutes.)

Programming for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington is made possible by partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives and the generous support of Texas Instruments.

Boeing Learning Center

An exciting space designed to provide parents and educators of all levels with methods and materials for teaching with primary source documents. Open Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Learn more about Education programs at the National Archives.

Exhibitions

Permanent Exhibits

Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom

  • Declaration of Independence
  • Constitution
  • Bill of Rights

The Charters of Freedom: Our Nation’s Founding Documents” takes a fresh look at the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Using historical documents from the holdings of the National Archives, we answer two key questions about the Charters: “How did they happen?” and “Why are they important?” This Rotunda exhibit also touches on the roles played by women and slaves in the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss the remarkable story of Elizabeth Burgin’s heroic role in a successful plot to free soldiers from British prison ships.

The Public Vaults” invites visitors into virtual stack areas to discover historic documents, films, maps, and photographs from the National Archives. In interactive displays, visitors may hear Presidents discuss some of the country’s greatest challenges, step into the boots of soldiers on the front lines, or follow an investigation of the sinking of the Titanic.

Beginning July 12, there will be a special display celebrating the centennial of President Gerald Ford. During his Presidency, in spite of Cold War tensions, the U.S. and the Soviet Union conducted the joint Apollo-Soyuz mission, a dramatic in-orbit linking of two spacecraft. Presidential materials documenting this historic endeavor will be on view through January 6, 2014.

A rare print on parchment of the Declaration of Independence—made from the original copperplate engraved by William J. Stone in 1823—is on display for a limited time. Courtesy of David M. Rubenstein.

This year’s featured adventurer in “Polar Exploration” is Marie Peary Stafford, the daughter of explorer Robert E. Peary, who was born and spent the first months of her life in Greenland.

Magna Carta Display
The 1297 Magna Carta’s new interactive display allows visitors to closely examine the document, generate a translation from the original Latin, and discover the connections between Magna Carta and American history. The 1297 Magna Carta is on loan to the National Archives from David M. Rubenstein. West Rotunda Gallery


Special Exhibition in Washington, DC

“Searching for the Seventies” Exhibit Opening
Bad fashion, odd fads, and disco dance music sum up the 1970s for many Americans. We contrast those years to the politically committed 1960s and economically booming 1980s. But the1970s were much more than leisure suits, streaking, and disco. During the seventies, profound changes took root in our politics, society, environment, and economy.

Take a new look at the decade through the lens of a Federal photography project called Project DOCUMERICA. Created by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1971, DOCUMERICA was born out of the decade’s environmental awakening. The photographers hired by the EPA took thousands of color photographs depicting pollution, waste, and blight, but they were given the freedom to also capture the era’s trends, fashions, and cultural shifts. Through September 8, 2013, Lawrence F. O'Brien Gallery


Featured Document on Display in Washington, DC

Alexander Gardner photographs of Gettysburg
In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, the National Archives will display two vintage albumen photographs by Alexander Gardner. The two photographs, "Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter," and "A Sharpshooter's Last Sleep," were taken shortly after the battle and were part of Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War (1866). June 18 through July 15, East Rotunda Gallery

25th Anniversary of the Civil Liberties Act
On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans from the western United States. On August 10, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which apologized for the incarceration and offered compensation to its survivors. To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Civil Liberties Act, the National Archives will display both the original Executive order and the public law. July 16 through August 19, 2013, East Rotunda Gallery.

50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
In commemoration of the march’s 50th anniversary, we display an iconic photograph from the records of the U. S. Information Agency and tell the story of the recently discovered identity of the young marcher pictured. August 20 through September 9, East Rotunda Gallery


Special Exhibition in College Park, Maryland

Auditorium Lobby at the National Archives Research Center:

"The Long View" features digitally produced facsimiles of historic panoramic photographs from the Still Picture holdings.

refer to caption

 

 

The exhibit not only showcases the wide variety of panoramic techniques, but also includes National Archives records such as cartographic maps and patent drawings that relate to the photographs. Thirty-four panoramas and other records are on display and span the period from 1864 to 1997.
See more panoramas online


Traveling Exhibits

The traveling exhibit program makes it possible for people across the country to experience selected historical documents and artifacts that reflect our national experience.

" Discovering the Civil War" is on display at the Tennessee State Museum through September 2.

" School House to White House" will be on display at the National Archives at Atlanta from April 29 to September 28.


Online Exhibits

Dozens of exhibits can be experienced online. Visit Now!

To the Brink: JFK and the Cuban Missile Crisis
An exhibit marking the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis..

What's Cooking Uncle Sam? logo “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?”
Unearth the stories and personalities behind the increasingly complex programs and legislation that affect what we eat. Learn about the Government’s extraordinary efforts, successes, and failures to change our eating habits. Find out why the Government wanted us to “Eat the Carp,” “Share the Meat,” and “Know Our Onions.” There are over 100 original records in the exhibit—including folk songs, war posters, educational films, and even seed packets. From Revolutionary War rations to Cold War cultural exchanges, discover the multiple ways that food has occupied the hearts and minds of Americans and their Government.
Online exhibit

Discovering the Civil War ExhibitDiscovering the Civil War
Unlock secrets, solve mysteries, and uncover unexpected events in this most extensive display ever assembled from the incomparable Civil War holdings of the National Archives.
Online exhibit

child with coal dust on face Eyewitness:  American Originals from the National Archives
Drawing on rarely displayed documents, audio recordings, and film footage culled from the extensive holdings of the National Archives and its Presidential libraries, "Eyewitness" features first-person accounts of watershed moments in history. Online exhibit


Locations, Hours, and Contact Information

The National Archives Experience
Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC

For details, see the Visitor's Map or visit the National Archives Experience.

Exhibit Hours:

  • 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
  • Last admission is at 5 p.m.
  • Open every day except Thanksgiving and December 25.

Admission free.

All events listed in the calendar are free unless noted; reservations are not required unless noted. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. For McGowan Theater programs, the doors to the building will open 30 minutes prior to the start of the program. Use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue.

For details, see the Visitor's Map or visit the National Archives Experience.

For reservations or to be placed on the mailing list, call 202-357-5000, or toll free at 1-877-874-7616, or e-mail public.program@nara.gov.

Museum Visit Reservations: To make reservations to visit the museum, especially during the height of the tourist season and holiday periods use online reservations. As of March 15, 2013, the last reservation slot is 4:30 p.m. If you have a reservation for later than 4:30 p.m., you will have to reschedule the visit.


The National Archives Research Center
700 Penn. Ave., NW, Washington, DC and 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD.

Research Hours for both locations:

  • Monday - Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • Closed on Federal holidays. National Archives research rooms will be closed on Thursday, July 4, for Independence Day.

Check the Washington, DC and College Park, MD location information for records pull times and other important details.

Call 202-357-5450 for a docent-led guided tour.

wheelchair icon TDD: 301-837-0482. The National Archives is fully accessible. To request an accommodation (such as a sign language interpreter) for a public program, please call 202-357-5000, or toll free at 1-877-874-7616, or e-mail public.program@nara.gov at least two weeks prior to the event.

 

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