National Archives at Kansas City

Screening and Discussion of -Eyes on the Prize: Bridge to Freedom-

Press Release: February 23, 2014

National Archives at Kansas City

The Civil Rights Century: Milestones in Black History Program Series

Screening and Discussion of Eyes on the Prize: Bridge to Freedom

For More Information Contact:
Kimberlee Ried, 816-268-8072

Kansas City (MO)…On Thursday, March 19 at 6:30 p.m., the National Archives will present, in partnership with Greater Kansas City Black History Study Group, Dr. Clarence Lang from the University of Kansas, who will provide commentary and discussion following a screening of Eyes on the Prize: Bridge to Freedom. A free light reception will precede the lecture at 6:00 p.m.

Eyes on the Prize is a PBS produced, American documentary, film series. The episode titled Bridge to Freedom focuses on the impact civil rights had in the protest marches led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. The film features interviews with those who were participants and opponents in the civil rights movement during the 1950s and 1960s. The title of the documentary series is derived from the folk song Keep Your Eyes on the Prize, which is used in each episode as the opening theme music. This March marks the 50th anniversary of the marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

This program is a part of the public program series titled The Civil Rights Century: Milestones in Black History that is presented in partnership with the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Greater Kansas City Black History Study Group.

Reservations are requested for this free program by calling 816-268-8010 or emailing kansascity.educate@nara.gov. Requests for ADA accommodations must be submitted five business days prior to events.

About the Speaker

Clarence Lang is an associate professor of African and African American Studies, and American Studies, at the University of Kansas. He received his doctorate in History from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Grassroots at the Gateway: Class Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis, 1936-75; and co-editor with Robbie Lieberman of Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement: “Another Side of the Story.” He is currently completing two manuscripts: Black America in the Shadow of the Sixties: Notes on the Civil Rights Movement, Neoliberalism, and Politics; and a co-edited volume entitled Reframing Randolph: Labor, Black Freedom, and the Legacies of A. Philip Randolph.

The Greater Kansas City Black History Study Group is a recognized organizing branch of the ASALH. The ASALH was founded in 1915 by Carter G. Woodson and has set the 2015 Black History theme as A Century of Black Life, History, and Culture. For information on meetings and membership visit www.facebook.com/kcblackhistory.

The National Archives at Kansas City is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit us online.

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LPM/LE-KC 2015-009

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