Press/Journalists
Press Release
November 20, 2001
Films at the National Archives in January and February

Washington, DC . . . In January and February, the National Archives and Records Administration presents film screenings with topics relating to African American History.

The screenings will be held in Room 105 of the National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, and in the auditorium at the National Archives at College Park, located at 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD unless otherwise noted. All programs are free and open to the public. Free parking is available at the National Archives at College Park. The times and dates may be verified by calling the National Archives public events line at (201) 501-5000. The hearing impaired should call TDD (202) 501-5404 for information.

Washington, DC Films

January

Friday, January 11- African American History
Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey, released in 2001. The compelling story of Dr. Ralph Bunche (1903-1971), the legendary African American scholar turned statesman, who was the first person of color to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950. The film examines the pioneering contributions Dr. Bunche made to international diplomacy, the de-colonization of the world, peacekeeping, and human rights in pre-civil rights America. Newsreel footage, archival photographs, and exclusive interviews combine to tell Dr. Bunche's story. Narrated by Sidney Poitier. A film by William Greaves. (117 minutes.) Noon. Seating is limited. Please call 202-501-5050, ext. 296, for reservations.

Friday, January 18 -African American History
Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy of Harry T. Moore, released in 2001. In 1951, civil rights activist Harry T. Moore and his wife were killed when a bomb shattered their house. This documentary explores the life and times of this enigmatic leader, a distinguished school teacher whose passionate crusade for equal rights could not be discouraged by either the white power structure or the more cautious factions of his own movement. Narrated by Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Music by Sweet Honey in the Rock. Produced by The Documentary Institute. (60 minutes.) Noon. Seating is limited. Please call 202-501-5040, ext. 296, for reservations.

Friday, January 25 - African American History
Journey to Little Rock: The Untold Story of Minnijean Brown Trickey, released in 2001. When Minnijean Brown Trickey was sixteen years old, she was one of the Little Rock Nine - the nine African American teenagers who defied death threats, hostile white demonstrators, and even the Arkansas National Guard, to attend the all-white Central High in 1957. This film follows her life of passionate social activism, and weaves a lyrical story of one woman's life, and the impact her determination and conviction. Directed by Rob Thompson. (52 minutes.) Noon. Seating is limited. Please call 202-501-5040, ext. 296, for reservations.

February

Friday, February 8 - African American History
Marcus Garvey: Look For Me in the Whirlwind, released in 2001. Marcus Garvey is one of the most controversial figures in American history. Both a powerful orator and a pompous autocrat, Mr. Garvey inspired the loyalty of millions of African Americans while infuriating many black leaders. This documentary uses a wealth of archival film, photographs, and documents to uncover the story of this Jamaican immigrant who between 1916 and 1921 built the largest black mass movement in world history. From PBS' American Experience series. (90 minutes.) Noon. Seating is limited. Please call 202-501-5040, ext. 296, for reservations.

Friday, February 15 - African American History
In Black and White: Black Cinema, released in 1992. In 1916, the first "all colored" film, The Birth of a Race, was made as a protest against D.W. Griffith's controversial Birth of a Nation. As a result, the black independent cinema of Harlem was born. Using archival newsreel and feature film footage, this documentary explores the inception, struggle, suppression, and survival of the black cinema from the 1920s to the 1950s. Produced by the BBC. (92 minutes.) Noon. Room 105. Please call 202-501-5040, ext. 296, for reservations.

Friday, February 22 - African American History
Arthur Ashe: Citizen of the World, released in 1994. This documentary produced by HBO Sports is a celebration of the life of this great tennis player - the first black player to capture a Grand Slam title when he won the U.S. Open. Also a respected advocate of human rights and civil rights, his untimely death from AIDS in 1993 did not silence his legacy. Directed by Julie Anderson. (59 minutes.) Noon. Seating is limited. Please call 202-501-5040, ext. 296, for reservations.

National Archives at College Park Events
8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD

Monday, January 14
Ralphe Bunche: An American Odyssey (117 minutes.) Noon.

Tuesday, January 22
Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy of Harry T. Moore (60 minutes.) Noon.

Monday, January 28
Journey to Little Rock: The Untold Story of Minnijean Brown Trickey (52 minutes.) Noon.

Monday, February 11
Marcus Garvey: Look For Me in the Whirlwind (90 minutes.) Noon.

Tuesday, February 19
In Black and White: Black Cinema (92 minutes.) Noon.

Monday, February 25
Arthur Ashe: Citizen of the World (59 minutes.) Noon.

For additional PRESS information, please contact the National Archives Public Affairs staff at (301) 837-1700 or by e-mail.

02-10

Press/Journalists >

The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
1-86-NARA-NARA or 1-866-272-6272

.