The National Archives at San Francisco

Guide to Archival Holdings (RG 155-196)

Records of the Wage and Hour Division (RG 155)

Administrative History

The Public Contracts Division was created to administer the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act of June 30, 1936, which required Government supply contracts exceeding $10,000 to stipulate minimum wage, overtime pay, safety, and health standards. The Wage and Hour Division was established in the Department of Labor to administer the minimum wage, overtime compensation, equal pay, and child labor standards provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of June 25, 1938. The two divisions were consolidated in 1942, and their area of responsibility was expanded by subsequent legislation.

Records Description

Dates: 1939-72
Volume: 76 cubic feet

Records of the Region 9 office, San Francisco. The records relate to investigations in Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington. Included are records from field offices in Los Angeles, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, and Seattle, which were subsequently transferred to the regional office, San Francisco. The records are case files, which typically contain case diary sheets, correspondence, legal papers, reports, and other materials.

Finding Aids
  • Draft inventory (1997).
  • Entry 2 in Herbert J. Horwitz, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions, NC 77 (1964).

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted due to privacy concerns.

Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance (RG 156)

Administrative History

The Ordnance Department was established as an independent bureau of the War Department by an act of May 14, 1812. It was responsible for the procurement and distribution of ordnance and equipment, the maintenance and repair of equipment, and the development and testing of new types of ordnance. The Department was abolished in 1962, and its functions were transferred to the U.S. Army Material Command. Among the field establishments maintained by the Ordnance Department within the United States have been armories, arsenals, and ordnance depots, district offices, and plants.

Records Description

Dates: 1846-1958
Volume: 157 cubic feet

Records of the Benicia Arsenal, California, 1846-1941. The records document the arsenal's role in U.S. expansion into the Northwest and expeditions to the Philippine Islands and Mexico before World War I; the development of aerial bombardment; medical and sanitary conditions at the arsenal; heavy gun installations on the Pacific coast, including San Francisco and the approaches to the bay. There is some documentation involving Generals Arthur MacArthur, Douglas MacArthur, John J. Pershing, and Jonathan Wainwright; the base hospital; and other arsenals and installations. Included are correspondence, issuances, monthly returns, muster rolls, registers, and reports.

Records of the San Francisco Ordnance District, 1919-58, serving northern California, Idaho, Montana, northern Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming. The records relate to the district's history, organization, policies, and procedures, and include historical reports and issuances.

Records of the Hawaiian Ordnance Depot, Honolulu, 1923-39. The records document depot organization, operations, and administrative matters and consist of issuances.

Records of the Sierra Ordnance Depot, Herlong, California, 1942-51. The records relate to depot management and organization and consist of issuances and reports.

Records of the Finance Office, Oakland Army Base, 1952-54. The records document research and equipment contracts and consist of contracts and supplemental agreements.

Finding Aids
  • Entries 1145-1184, 1568-1573, and 1653 in Evelyn Wade and Garry D. Ryan, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance. Part II: Records of Ordnance Field Installations, NM 59 (1965).
  • Partial series list.

Records of the Capital Issues Committee (RG 158)

Administrative History

A Capital Issues Committee was created within the Federal Reserve Board in January 1918; in May it was replaced by a new Capital Issues Committee, an independent agency under authority of the War Finance Corporation Act of April 5, 1918. The two committees were created to determine whether proposed issues of securities were in the national interest, and to discourage the diversion of capital to unessential projects. The Committee suspended its activities at the end of 1918, and a Presidential proclamation of August 30, 1919, directed it to terminate its affairs.

Much of the work of the Committee was handled by the subcommittees (or district committees) that were established in each Federal Reserve district.

Records Description

Dates: 1918-19
Volume: less than 1 cubic foot

Records of the District Committee on Capital Issues, Twelfth Federal Reserve District, San Francisco. The records document decisions made on applications for issuance of new bonds, stocks, and other securities in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington. Included are correspondence, decisions, and minutes of meetings.

Finding Aids


Entries 36-38 in Norwood N. Biggs and William F. Sherman, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Capital Issues Committee, NC 85 (1964).

Records of the Selective Service System (World War I) (RG 163)

Administrative History

The Selective Service System, under the direction of the Office of the Provost Marshal General, was authorized by an act of May 18, 1917, to register and induct men into military service. Much of the management of the draft was left to the States, where local draft boards were established on the basis of 1 for every 30,000 people. These boards, appointed by the President on the recommendation of the State Governor, registered, classified, inducted, and delivered to mobilization camps men who were eligible for the draft. Legal and medical advisory boards assisted the local boards and registrants, and district boards were established to pass on occupational exemption claims and to hear appeals. The Provost Marshal General's Office worked with local and district boards through Selective Service State Headquarters. Classification ceased shortly after the Armistice in 1918, and by May 31, 1919, all Selective Service organizations were closed except the Office of the Provost Marshal General, which was abolished July 15, 1919.

Records Description

Dates: 1917-19
Volume: 36 cubic feet

Records of local and district boards in California, Hawaii, and Nevada. The records are:
  • docket books for Oakland and San Francisco. Included in each entry are an individual's name and dates of actions taken such as notification, appeal, and/or exemption;
  • lists of inductees in northern California and Nevada, except Clark County. Included for each individual are name, occupation, serial number, date of induction, and camp or station to which entrained;
  • appeals granted and denied in California, Hawaii, and Nevada;
  • delinquent classification lists for Hawaii and Nevada;
  • indexes of names of delinquents and deserters in Arizona and California;
  • lists of delinquents and deserters in California, Hawaii, and Nevada.
Finding Aid
Entries 27, 28, 30, 33, and 34 in Lucy E. Weidman, comp.,Preliminary Checklist of the Records of the Selective Service System, 1917-19, PC 26 (1945).

Records of the Cooperative State Research Service (RG 164)

Administrative History

An agency of the Department of Agriculture, the Cooperative State Research Service administers research programs, including the agricultural research act (Hatch Act revised) that provides for State/Federal cooperative funding for agricultural research programs at State agricultural experiment stations of the fifty States and the insular possessions; the cooperative forestry research program; the 1890 land-grant colleges and Tuskegee University research program, and others. The Service's predecessor, the Office of Experiment Stations, was established on October 1, 1888, to popularize the results of agricultural experiments and to disseminate scientific information among experiment stations created under the Hatch Act of 1887. Subsequent legislation increased the control of the Office over the finances and work of the stations. In 1915 the Office of Experiment Stations was combined with other offices involved in extension and home economics work to form the States Relations Service. When the States Relations Service was abolished in 1923, the Office of Experiment Stations resumed its separate identity. On November 2, 1953, the Office was placed under the newly created Agricultural Research Service. After various changes in name and status, it was detached from the Agricultural Research Service in the early 1960's and established as the Cooperative State Research Service.

Records Description

Dates: 1908-32
Volume: 7 cubic feet

Records of the Guam Agricultural Experiment Station. The records relate to experimental work in agronomy, animal husbandry, entomology, and horticulture; extension activities involving residents; and administrative matters. Included are correspondence, issuances, reports, and informational manuscripts on subjects such as vegetable production and use. Nontextual records consist of some photographs of livestock, plants, test plots, and farm buildings and equipment included in the annual reports.

Finding Aids

Entries 104-105 in Edward E. Hill, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Office of Experiment Stations, NC 132 (1965).

Records of the Office of Civilian Defense (RG 171)

Administrative History


The Office of Civilian Defense (OCD) was established in the Office for Emergency Management by an executive order of May 20, 1941, to coordinate Federal, State and local defense relationships regarding the protection of civilians during air raids and other emergencies, and to facilitate civilian participation in war programs. It took over the functions and records of the Division of State and Local Cooperation of the Advisory Commission to the Council of National Defense. Fiscal, budgetary, and personnel responsibilities for the OCD were handled by the Division of Central Administrative Services of the Office for Emergency Management until 1942 when these responsibilities, with minor exceptions, were transferred to the OCD. The nine regional offices that coordinated the work of State and local defense organizations were closed June 30, 1944, and an executive order of June 4, 1945, terminated the OCD.

Records Description

Dates: 1941-44
Volume: 143 cubic feet

Records of the following offices:
  • Ninth Civilian Defense Region office, San Francisco, which served Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington. Included are records of the administrative division, civilian war services, director's office, evacuation and transportation division, medical division, protection branch, and public counsel section.
  • Northern California-Nevada Sector office, San Francisco.
The records document coordination of Federal, State, and local civilian defense activities, publicity programs, and administrative matters. Subjects include the air-raid warning service, camouflage, civilian evacuation, defense against gas and fire attacks, emergency medical services, fire defense, light control and blackouts, organization of motor transport units, protective construction, protective equipment, and community cooperation in the various wartime programs for car sharing, child care and welfare, conservation, and victory gardens. The records consist of correspondence, clippings, issuances, outlines of programs, publications, reports, and training materials. Nontextual records consist of maps and photographs interfiled with textual records.

Finding Aids

Series title list.
Region IX entries 1-111 and 127-132 in Inventory of the Records of the Office of Civilian Defense, volume2, unnumbered PI (June 1954).

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted due to privacy concerns.

Records of the Federal Communications Commission (Rg 173)

Administrative History

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was established as an independent agency by the Communications Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 1064) to regulate interstate and foreign communications by radio and wire (telegraph, telephone, and cable).It largely replaced the Federal Radio Commission, which was abolished by the same act. From the Interstate Commerce Commission the FCC assumed regulation of telephone, telegraph, and cable companies; from the Department of State it assumed licensing of submarine cable operators.

The scope of the FCC embraces radio and television broadcasting; telephone, telegraph, and cable television operation; two-way radio operations; and satellite communication. It regulates the charges and operating practices of common carriers engaged in interstate or foreign communications, issues broadcasting licenses, assigns broadcast frequencies, classifies ratio and television stations and prescribes the nature of their services, and enforces radio requirements for some classes of vessels. The FCC maintains its headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Its regional structure has changed frequently. In 1950 there were nine regional offices and more than 20 district offices. In 1996 it had three regional offices and numerous field offices.

Records Description

Dates: 1950-52
Volume: less than one cubic foot

Records of the San Francisco Field Office. The records relate to controversies over program content, investigations of the radio and television industry, and wiretapping. Included are affidavits, clippings, letters, memorandums, pleadings, and telegrams.

Finding Aids

Draft inventory.

General Records of the Department of Labor (RG 174)

Administrative History

The present Department of Labor was created by an act of March 4, 1913, as one of the successor agencies of the Department of Commerce and Labor. (Although a Department of Labor had previously existed, it was without Cabinet rank and was the predecessor agency of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.) The Department has jurisdiction over matters relating to the welfare of American wage earners, including the improvement of their working conditions and the advancement of employment opportunities. The records of the Secretary of Labor and staff officials comprise most of the records in the record group; records of several commissions and committees are also included. Records of bureaus and other operational units constitute separate record groups.

Records Description

Dates: 1950-65
Volume: 10 cubic feet

Records of the Solicitor, Region IX, San Francisco, serving Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington. The records relate to employment of Mexican nationals as agricultural workers ("Braceros") in California under the Migrant Labor Agreement of 1951, which expired on December 31, 1964. The records document legal assistance provided to the Bureau of Employment Security, primarily regarding investigation and settlement of complaints and labor disputes. Some background information about agreement negotiation, policy and procedures, and statistical data is also included. The records consist of agreements, case files, correspondence, decisions and determinations, issuances, memorandums, and reports.

Finding Aids

Folder title list.

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted due to privacy concerns.

Records of the Chemical Warfare Service (RG 175)

Administrative History

The Chemical Warfare Service, a technical service under the General Staff, was established as part of the National Army on June 28, 1918, to develop, produce, and test materials and apparatus for gas warfare and to organize and train military personnel in methods of defense against gas. As part of a War Department reorganization, effective March 9, 1942, it became part of the Services of Supply, later designated Army Service Forces. In 1946, it was again placed under the General Staff, and on September 6, 1946, its name was changed to the Chemical Corps which was abolished on August 1, 1962.

Records Description

Dates: 1940-50
Volume: 1 cubic foot

Records of the Chemical Warfare Procurement District Office, San Francisco, serving Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. The records relate to procurement from industrial contractors of chemical warfare materiel, such as chemical and incendiary bombs, gas masks, smoke generators, and chemical mortar shells; property account cases involving the Owl Plant, Azusa, California, and Joyce, Inc., Los Angeles, California; historical studies of the organization; and administrative matters. Included are issuances, memorandums, organization charts, and reports.

Finding Aids

Series title list.

Records of the U.S. Maritime Commission (RG 178)

Administrative History


The U.S. Maritime Commission was created as an independent agency by the Merchant Marine Act of June 29, 1936, to further develop and maintain a merchant marine for the promotion of U.S. commerce and defense. It was authorized to regulate U.S. ocean commerce, supervise freight and terminal facilities, and administer Government funds to construct and operate commercial ships. The Commission was the successor agency of the U.S. Shipping Board and the U.S. Shipping Board Bureau of the Department of Commerce. The Commission was abolished on May 24, 1950, and its functions were transferred to the Department of Commerce where they were assigned to the Federal Maritime Board and the Maritime Administration (see RG 357).

Records Description

Dates: 1942-47
Volume: 16 cubic feet

Records of the Pacific Coast Maritime Industry Board, San Francisco. The records document controversies between the longshoremen's union and waterfront employees, contract negotiations, manpower proposals, and other maritime labor relations matters. Included are correspondence, labor-management agreements, minutes of meetings, and transcripts.

Records of the Director, West Coast Regional Construction Division, Oakland. The records relate to shipbuilding, shipyards, coordination of materials and equipment, and other matters pertaining to ship construction during World War II. They include conference reports, letters, and memorandums. Nontextual records consist of a separate series of photographs of a housing project in Richmond, California.

Finding Aids

Box contents lists and series descriptions for the records of the Pacific Coast Maritime Industry Board.

Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments (RG 181)

Administrative History

Soon after its establishment in 1798, the Department of the Navy created navy yards and other fleet service shore establishments. A system of naval districts for the United States, its territories, and possessions was not formally established, however, until 1903. This system was supervised by the Bureau of Navigation until 1915 when it became the responsibility of the Chief of Naval Operations. By the end of World War II, the districts exercised almost complete military and administrative control over naval operations within their limits, including naval shipyards, stations, training stations, air installations, and advance bases.

Records Description

Dates: 1854-1996
Volume: 7,437 cubic feet

Records of the following naval districts:
  • 12th Naval District, Treasure Island, San Francisco, 1903-75. The district had jurisdiction over northern California and northern Nevada, and all of Colorado and Utah. Included are records of the:
    • Commandant's Office;
    • Industrial Manager;
    • Inspector General;
    • Intelligence Officer;
    • Legal Officer;
    • Naval Air Bases Commander;
    • Port Director's Office;
    • Public Works Officer;
    • Records Officer;
    • Ship Delivery Points Office.
  • 14th Naval District, Pearl Harbor, 1912-60. This district comprised the Hawaiian archipelago, including Midway, Wake, and Washington Islands; the Palmyra and Johnston Atolls; and adjacent sea areas. Included are records of the:
    • Commandant's Office;
    • District Staff Headquarters;
    • Harbor Defense Unit;
    • Hawaiian Sea Frontier;
    • Industrial Manager;
    • Inspector General;
    • Intelligence Officer;
    • Legal Officer;
    • Local Defense Force;
    • Logistical Board;
    • Logistical Officer;
    • Medical Officer;
    • Naval Air Bases Commander;
    • Port Director's Office;
    • Public Works Officer;
    • Real Estate Division;
    • Shore Patrol;
    • Supply Officer;
    • War Plans Officer.
The records document the overall supervision of administrative and military commanders within the district, including the attack on Pearl Harbor, land acquisition, the search for Amelia Earhart, and World War II planning. Included are correspondence, issuances, logs, and reports. Nontextual records include separate series of drawings for overseas and Hawaiian projects, and for the Missile Impact Location System Project; charts and maps of installations around Pearl Harbor; and photographs of construction in the Hawaiian Islands, islands in the Pacific Ocean, and other subjects.

Records of the following navy yards:

  • Hunters Point, California, 1907-74, including records of the Commander's Office; Industrial Manager (Assistant); and Supervisor of Shipbuilding and Inspector of Ordnance; and unnumbered microfilm, "The Drydocker", 1944-65.
  • Mare Island, California, 1854-1980, including records of the Captain of the Yard; Commandant's Office; Construction and Repair; Equipment and Recruiting; Judge Advocate General; Magazine Division; the Manufacturing Department; Medicine and Surgery; Navigation Office; Ordnance Department; Steam Engineering; Stone Dry Dock Section; Submarine Center; Supply Department; and Yards and Docks;
  • Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 1899-1963, including records of the Captain of the Yard; Commandant's Office; Construction and Repair; Equipment and Recruiting; Fleet Salvage Unit; Ordnance Department; Steam Engineering; USS Ward (DD 139); and Yards and Docks.
The records document the construction, repair and overhaul of capital ships, auxiliary ships, and submarines (Mare Island specialized in submarines after 1945). Among the subjects covered are: the Port Chicago explosion and its aftermath; initial salvage operations after the Pearl Harbor attack; repair of vessels damaged in the Pearl Harbor attack and in subsequent World War II battles; radiation surveys of and decontamination efforts on vessels involved in Operation Crossroads; and asbestos use. Included are correspondence, issuances, logs, publications, registers, reports, and rolls. Nontextual records include separate series of artwork from technical reports; drawings of wireless telegraph apparatus; and of righting and raising operations on sunken battleships; drawings of vessels; and photographs of salvage operations and of the Hunters Point Navy Yard.

Records of the following naval bases:

  • Pearl Harbor, 1945-77;
  • San Francisco, 1946-57, including records of the Commander's Office and the Mare Island-Vallejo Area Commander's Office.
The records document intermediate-level supervision of naval activities. The records are primarily correspondence.

Records of the following naval stations:

  • Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 1903-56, including records of the Commander's Office and the "Old Naval Station;"
  • Treasure Island, California, 1944-59, including records of the Naval Receiving Station.
The records document administration of naval reservations, processing and training personnel, and service and support functions. Included are correspondence, issuances, logs, and reports.

Records of the following naval air installations:

  • Naval Air Facilities at Hilo, Hawaii, 1943-47, and Honolulu, Hawaii, 1944-45;
  • Naval Air Stations at Alameda, California, ca. 1938-73; Barbers Point, Hawaii, 1946-71; Fallon, Nevada, 1968-72; Ford Island, Hawaii, 1947-60; Kahului, Hawaii, 1943-47; Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, 1939-50; and Wahiwa, Hawaii, 1950-56;
  • Naval Auxiliary Landing Field, Monterey, California, 1964-72.
The records document general administration, daily operations, and wartime activities of naval air installations, including control and operation of air strips; aircraft inspection, maintenance, repair, and supply. The records consist of correspondence, issuances, and logs.

Records of the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory, San Francisco, 1946-69. The records relate to nuclear testing projects; radioactive contamination and decontamination of sites, material, and personnel; and routine administrative activities. Included are correspondence, notebooks, and publications. Nontextual records consist of separate series of charts and diagrams prepared for technical reports.

Records of the following communications and radio stations:
  • Naval Communications Stations, Honolulu, 1948-55, and Pearl Harbor, 1947-57;
  • Naval Radio Stations, Mare Island, California, 1940-41, and Wahiwa, Hawaii, 1950-54.
The records relate to daily operations and consist of correspondence.

Records of the following installations:

  • Naval Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nevada, 1942-50;
  • Naval Section Base, Bishops Point, Hawaii, 1942-45;
  • Naval Security Office, Skaggs Island, Sonoma, California, 1966-72;
  • Naval Supply Center (Pacific Requisition Control Office), Oakland, California, 1939-62;
  • Naval Training Center, Mare Island, California, 1945-46;
  • Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California, 1942-74;
  • Navy Pre-Flight School, St. Mary's College, Moraga, California, 1942-46;
  • Pacific and Alaskan Divisions, Treasure Island, California, 1945-56;
  • Pacific Fleet, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 1992;
  • Pacific Reserve Fleet, Mare Island, California, 1956-68.
The records document general administration and daily operations. Included are correspondence, issuances, and reports. Nontextual records include a separate series of photographs of Navy Pre-Flight School activities and personnel.

Records of the Western Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command, San Bruno, California, 1932-95. The records concern construction at Hamilton Army Airfield and historical surveys of Mare Island Naval Complex. Included are reports. Nontextual records comprise a separate series of drawings of Hamilton Army Airfield.

Records of Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, Oakland, California, ca. 1940-96. The records relate to hospital history and base closure. They include hospital newspapers and publications. Nontextual records consist of photographs and a master floor plan.

Records of the Lockheed-Sunnyvale defense plant representative, Sunnyvale, California, 1966-68. The records relate to ordnance equipment and material and consist of reports.

Finding Aids
  • Navy Filing Manual (1925, 1941, 1950, and 1959 editions).
  • Series title lists for all holdings.
  • For the 12th Naval District and Mare Island Navy Yard: indexes and registers for many correspondence series.
  • For the Commandant's Office, 12th Naval District: folder title list for some records.
  • Entries 37-38, 47-59, 138-232, and 393-434 in Harry Schwartz and Lee Saegesser, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, NM 72 (1966).
  • Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments in the Regional Archives Part of Record Group 181, SL 58 (1991).

Restrictions
Access to some files or portions of documents may be restricted due to national security classification and/or privacy concerns.

Records of the National Resources Planning Board (RG 187)

Administrative History

The National Resources Planning Board (NRPB) was established in the Executive Office of the President by Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1939. It inherited the functions of the National Planning Board of the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works (created July 20, 1933) and its various successors. The NRPB and its predecessors planned public works, coordinated Federal planning relating to conservation and efficient use of national resources, and encouraged local, State, and regional planning. The NRPB was abolished by an act of June 26, 1943.

In 1934, the NPB began using the regional advisors and State advisory boards of the Public Works Administration for field contacts with State and local governments. On March 1, 1934, the NPB began developing a field organization of its own, establishing 12 Planning Districts throughout the country. The number of districts was subsequently reduced to 11. On May 13, 1937, the 11 planning district offices became nine regional offices. (Two additional regions were subsequently added for Alaska and the Caribbean territories.) The NRPB was liquidated in 1943.

The regional offices primarily acted as clearinghouses of planning information, carried out the Board's activities in the field, and coordinated regional, State, and local natural resource planning activities.

Records Description

Dates: 1936-43
Volume: 52 cubic feet

Records of the Region 8 (Pacific Southwest) office, Berkeley, serving Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and Utah. The records document planning activities coordinated between public and private agencies at the local, State, and national levels, including drainage basin committees and State planning boards. Planning activities involved studies of various natural resources and economic trends, such as development of urban, industrial, and transportation systems; land use patterns; employment and population trends; water, energy, and recreational resources; and resource conservation. The records consist of correspondence, clippings, issuances, printed materials, and reports. Nontextual records consist of maps interfiled with textual records.

Finding Aids

Entries 38 and 39 in Virgil E. Baugh, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Regional Offices of the National Planning Board, PI 64 (1954).

Records of the Office of Price Administration (RG 188)

Administrative History


The Office of Price Administration (OPA) originated in the Price Stabilization and Consumer Protection Divisions of the Advisory Commission to the Council of National Defense on May 29, 40, and in their successor, the Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply, created in April 1941 and redesignated the Office of Price Administration by an Executive order of August 28, 1941. The OPA was given statutory recognition as an independent agency by the Emergency Price Control Act of January 30, 1942. Under this legislation the OPA attempted to stabilize prices and rents by establishing maximum prices for commodities (other than agricultural products which were under the control of the Secretary of Agriculture) and rents in defense areas. It also rationed scarce essential commodities and authorized subsidies for the production of some goods. Most of the price and rationing controls were lifted between August 1945 and November 1946.

Records Description

Dates: 1942-47
Volume: 227 cubic feet

Records of the following boards and offices:
  • Elko, Nevada, price board;
  • Fresno, California, district office and price board;
  • Honolulu, Hawaii, territorial office;
  • Redwood City, California, price board;
  • Reno, Nevada, district office;
  • Sacramento, California, district office;
  • San Francisco, California, district office and price board;
  • San Francisco, California, Region 8 office, serving Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
The records document price levels of commodities and services, rationing, and the impact of the war effort on local life. Included are records of the executive office and the accounting, enforcement, information, price, and rationing departments. The records include case files, correspondence, issuances, minutes, reports, and surveys. Finding Aids
  • Entries 507-513, 521-522, and 525-526 in Meyer H. Fishbein and Elaine C. Bennett, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Accounting Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 32 (1951).
  • Entries 1324-1338, 1343-1345, and 1349 in Fishbein, Walter Weinstein, and Albert W. Winthrop, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Price Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 95 (1956).
  • Entries 336-338, 340, 343, 345-346, and 348 in Meyer H. Fishbein et al., comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Rationing Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 102 (1958).
  • Entries 219-233 in Betty R. Bucher, comp., Preliminary Inventory of the Information Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 119 (1959).
  • Entries 283-296 in Fishbein and Bucher, comps., Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Enforcement Department of the Office of Price Administration, PI 120 (1959).

Related Microfilm Publications

M164, Studies and Reports of the Office of Price Administration, 1941-1946.

Records of the Public Housing Administration (RG 196)

Administrative History

The Federal Public Housing Authority (FPHA) was established in 1942 as part of the National Housing Agency. It acquired functions relating to public housing that had formerly been performed by the Federal Works Agency, the War Department, the Department of the Navy, and the Farm Security Administration. The FPHA provided housing for war workers in localities where impending or existing shortages would hinder war activities. As World War II progressed, the FPHA's development activities decreased and its management and disposition functions became more important. In 1947, the FPHA became the Public Housing Administration under the Housing and Home Finance Agency. In 1965, it was abolished and its functions transferred to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD, RG 207).

The FPHA and the PHA operated regional offices throughout the country to oversee Federally administered public housing programs, and to aid local public housing agencies with low rent housing and slum clearance projects.

Records Description

Dates: 1942-57
Volume: 29 cubic feet

Records of Region VI, San Francisco. The records relate to housing and property appraisal in Arizona, California, Oregon, Utah, and Washington, and loan programs primarily for prefabricated housing in Arizona and California. The records are primarily case files, which include applications, appraisals, correspondence, and legal papers. Nontextual records include maps interfiled with textual records.

Finding Aids

Series descriptions and selected folder lists.

The National Archives at San Francisco >

The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
1-86-NARA-NARA or 1-866-272-6272

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