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Press Release
Press Release ยท Wednesday, August 18, 1999

Press Release
August 18, 1999
Films at the National Archives in October

Washington, DC . . . In October, the National Archives and Records Administration presents film screenings relating to Hispanic Heritage Month and a new documentary by Rory Kennedy, American Hollow (1999).

The screenings will be held in the theater of the National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, and in the auditorium the National Archives at College Park, which is located at 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD. All programs are free and open to the public. Free parking is available at the National Archives at College Park. The times and dates may be verified by calling the National Archives public events line at (201)501-5000. The hearing impaired should call TDD (202) 501-5404 for information.

Please Note: The theater at the downtown National Archives Building is equipped with a system that allows the hearing-impaired to use a set of headphones, or neck loop and a small receiver, to enhance the volume of the public address system. Visitors may request these devices in the projection booth.

Washington, DC Events

Friday, October 8 -- Archival Film: Hispanic Heritage
The National Archives presents two documentaries from the National Archives motion picture holdings produced by the United States Information Agency.

The School at Rincon Santo, released in 1963. Designed to promote the Kennedy Administration's "Alliance for Progress" aid program in Latin America, this poignant short film tells the story of building the first and only schoolhouse in the Colombian village of Rincon Santo. Directed by James Blue. (11 minutes.)

And Now, Miguel, released in 1953. This classic documentary depicts a Hispanic family living in the American Southwest who inherited the traditions of sheep-raising from their Spanish ancestors. Directed by Joseph Krumgold. (53 minutes.) Noon. Theater.

Thursday, October 14 and Friday, October 15 -- New Documentary
American Hollow, released in 1999. For a year, documentary filmmaker Rory Kennedy lived with the Bowlings, an Appalachian family residing in one of the most impoverished areas of the United States. The resulting film shows how deeply the film maker was trusted by her su