2015 Press Releases

National Archives Hosts Special Summer Daytime Programs
Press Release · Tuesday, July 17, 1945

Washington, DC

Washington, DC…The National Archives presents a series of daytime public programs this summer. These programs are free and open to the public and will be held at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Programs in the William G. McGowan Theater will be streamed live on YouTube (unless otherwise noted) and attendees should use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue at 7th Street, NW. Book signings will follow each book talk. Attendees to programs in the Research Center should use the Research Entrance at 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Metro accessible on the Yellow and Green lines, Archives/Navy Memorial/Penn Quarter station.

FAMILY PROGRAM: Constitution-in-Action Learning Lab
July 1 and July 7, 10 a.m.–noon; July 9 at 10 am–noon, and 2–4 p.m.
Boeing Learning Center
Families take on the role of researchers and archivists for a day! Your family will work together to locate and analyze facsimile documents, and find the connection each has to the Constitution. Reservations are required; go to: www.archivesfoundation.org/events/.

This program is made possible in part by the National Archives Foundation through the support of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and John Hancock Financial.

GENEALOGY TALK: Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives
Wednesday, July 1, at 11 a.m., Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance)
Learn how to do basic genealogical research using Federal records at the National Archives. Lectures take place on the first Wednesday of each month.

RESEARCH PRESENTATION: How to Use the New National Archives Catalog
Wednesday, July 1, at 2 p.m., William G. McGowan Theater
Jason Clingerman, archives specialist, demonstrates and answers questions about the new National Archives Catalog, the online public portal to our records and information about these records. Presentation materials are available online.

EVENT: July 4th Celebration
Saturday, July 4, 10 a.m. –4 p.m., National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue steps between 7th and 9th Streets.
Join us for our biggest celebration of the year! Activities include Declaration of Independence Reading Ceremony and free hands-on family activities, including story time and crafts. Details online.

BOOK TALK: Our Crime was Being Jewish: Hundreds of Holocaust Survivors Tell Their Stories
Thursday, July 9, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Historian Anthony S. Pitch has collected and compiled the memories of hundreds of Holocaust survivors. He will discuss stories of persecutions at the start of the war as well as the daily hell of the concentration camps.

PANEL DISCUSSION: Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969–1973
Tuesday, July 14, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Erin Mahan, chief historian of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, moderates a discussion on the contributions of former Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird (1969–73) during the Vietnam War. The panel features author Richard A. Hunt; Jeremi Suri, Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin; and George Herring, Alumni Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Kentucky. Former Senator John Warner will make opening remarks. Presented in partnership with the Historical Office of the Secretary of Defense.

BOOK TALK: Potsdam: The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe
Wednesday, July 15, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
On July 17, 1945, Harry Truman, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin gathered in a quiet suburb of Berlin to discuss, as Churchill put it, "the gravest matters in the world." Historian Michael Neiberg captures the delegates' personalities and discusses their dramatic debates over how to end the war.

FILM SCREENING: The Lost Weekend (will not be streamed on YouTube)
Saturday, July 18, at 2 p.m., William G. McGowan Theater
Ray Milland won an Oscar® for his portrayal of an alcoholic in this drama directed by Billy Wilder. Also stars Jane Wyman and Howard da Silva. (1945; 101 minutes.)

Related exhibit: Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History
Lawrence F. O'Brien Gallery, through January 10, 2016
Spirited Republic uses nearly100 National Archives documents and artifacts to reveal the Federal Government's efforts, successes, and failures to change our drinking habits, from whiskey rations to the Continental Army to the Whiskey Rebellion to Prohibition and beyond. Spirited Republic is presented in part by the National Archives Foundation through the generous support of HISTORY® and the Lawrence F. O'Brien Family.

CAMP: Second Annual Genealogy Camp for Kids at the National Archives
July 20–24, 9 a.m.–noon, Boeing Learning Center
This hands-on camp for ages 12 and up will introduce the basics of genealogy research. This camp is full. To be added to the waitlist, e-mail education@nara.gov with "Genealogy Camp" in the subject line. This program is made possible in part by the National Archives Foundation through the support of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and John Hancock Financial.

BOOK TALK: The Creole Affair: The Slave Rebellion that Led the U.S. and Great Britain to the Brink of War
Wednesday, July 22, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Author Arthur Downey discusses the most successful slave rebellion in American history. Held against their will aboard the Creole—a slave ship on its way from Richmond to New Orleans in 1841—the rebels seized control of the ship and changed course to the Bahamas. Because the Bahamas were subject to British rule of law, the slaves were eventually set free, and their presence on foreign soil sparked one of America's most contentious diplomatic battles with the United Kingdom.

BOOK TALK: Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights
Wednesday, July 29, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater
Author and professor Lennard Davis tells the untold story of how a group of leftist Berkeley hippies made an alliance with upper-crust, conservative Republicans to bring about a truly bipartisan bill. The Americans with Disabilities Act has since become the model for most civil rights laws around the world.

GENEALOGY TALK: Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives
Wednesday, August 5, at 11 a.m., Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance)
Learn how to do basic genealogical research using Federal records at the National Archives. Lectures take place on the first Wednesday of each month.

IMMIGRATION WORKSHOP: Professional Development for Teachers
Thursday, August 6, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., Boeing Learning Center
Explore immigration by examining primary sources from the National Archives. Brainstorm new ways to use these records from Ellis Island and Angel Island into your teaching. Take a tour of our exhibit “Records of Rights.” To register, email education@nara.gov with “Immigration Workshop” in the subject line.

FILM SCREENING: Harvey (will not be streamed on YouTube)
Saturday, August 15, at 2pm, William G. McGowan Theater
James Stewart delivers one of his most memorable performances as Elwood P. Dowd, whose companion is an invisible six-foot rabbit named Harvey. Also stars Josephine Hull and Peggy Dowd. Directed by Henry Koster (1950; 104 minutes.)

ADULT EVENT: Constitution-in-Action Hands-on Adult Workshop
Wednesday, August 26, 5:30–7:30 p.m., Boeing Learning Center
Experience the excitement of interpreting historical documents! Take on a special research assignment from the President to launch a new campaign in a fun hands-on simulation. To register, email education@nara.gov with “Adult Workshops” in the subject line.

The National Archives is fully accessible, and Assisted Listening Devices are available in the McGowan Theater upon request.

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For press information contact the National Archives Public Affairs staff at 202-357-5300.

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