1950 Census

1950 Census Records

On April 1, 2022, the 1950 Census records were released and are available free of charge.
Search the 1950 Census at 1950Census.Archives.gov

 

Taken every 10 years since 1790, the United States census provides a snapshot of the nation's population. Because of a 72-year restriction on access to the records, the most recent census year currently available is 1950.

On April 1, 2022, the 1950 Census was released, and users can access it for free through a dedicated website at 1950census.archives.gov. This population census is the 17th decennial census of the United States. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has digitized and is providing free online access to the 1950 Census population schedules for U.S. states and territories, enumeration district maps, and enumeration district descriptions.  

Bulk Download:  In addition, researchers can download the full 1950 Census dataset.

How You Can Help

You can search the 1950 Census website by name and location. You can also search by Indian Reservation for form P8 Indian Reservation Schedules.

To develop the initial name index, we are using Amazon Web Services’ artificial intelligence / optical character recognition (AI/OCR) Textract tool to extract the handwritten names from the digitized 1950 Census population schedules. 

Because the initial name index is built on optical character recognition (OCR) technology, it is not 100-percent accurate. The National Archives is asking for your help in submitting name updates to the index using a transcription tool that is available on the 1950 Census website. You can help us improve the accuracy of the name index and make the records more accessible for everyone. More information will be forthcoming.

Resources

 

Additional Articles and NARA Blog Posts

"Preparing for the 1950 Census," AOTUS blog

Census Records: The 72-Year Rule, Pieces of History blog

"Counting Down Until the Release of the 1950 Census!," The Text Message blog

"1950 Census on Track for 2022 Release, Despite Pandemic," National Archives News

Genealogy Series 2022 Kicks Off With “What's on the 1950 Census,” National Archives News

Volunteers Can Contribute to Nation’s History by Collaborating on 1950 Census Records, National Archives News

Archivist Explores History of 1950 Census Indian Reservation Schedule, National Archives News

Release of 1950 Census Will Increase Access to Records, National Archives News

Explore 1950 Census Resources on New Archives.gov Page, National Archives News

1950 Census Release Will Offer Enhanced Digital Access, Public Collaboration Opportunity, National Archives News

Contact Us

For more information, contact us

 

What are people asking on History Hub about the 1950 Census?

History Hub H

 

Find answers to your 1950 Census questions on History Hub

 

1950 Census Celebration Videos

Join a virtual celebration of the 1950 Census records release by watching remarks from the Archivist of the United States, the Director of the Census Bureau, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of the Interior, and other distinguished individuals.

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David S. Ferriero

Archivist of the United States

YouTube video

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Robert Santos

Director, U.S. Census Bureau

YouTube video

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Gina M. Raimondo
U.S. Secretary of Commerce
YouTube video

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Deb Haaland
U.S. Secretary of the Interior
YouTube video

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Soledad O'Brien
Host, Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien
National Archives Foundation Board Member
YouTube video

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A'Lelia Bundles
Author and Journalist
National Archives Foundation Board Member
YouTube video

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Jay Bosanko
Chief Operating Officer
National Archives and Records Administration
YouTube video

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Pamela Wright
Chief Innovation Officer
National Archives and Records Administration
YouTube video

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Claire Kluskens
Genealogy/Census Subject Matter Expert
National Archives and Records Administration
YouTube video

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Margo Anderson, PhD
Distinguished Professor Emerita, History & Urban Studies
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
YouTube video

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Michael L. Knight
Web Branch Chief
Office of Innovation
National Archives and Records Administration
YouTube video

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